• The genealogist who helped capture the Golden State Killer

    A key, as-yet-untold role in connecting DeAngelo to the crimes was played by Barbara Rae-Venter, who had kept quiet about her work to help solve the infamous cold case until this week. Hand-picked by Paul Holes — the retired Contra Costa District Attorney inspector who has been credited with using genealogy to catch DeAngelo — the 70-year-old Northern California resident offered critical DNA knowledge to the team of investigators leading the manhunt. Click here to read the entire story in eastbaytimes.com.

  • Genealogy giants: Lessons from the quiet digital disruptors

    Key takeaways

    • The genealogy industry has grown from an elite paper-based profession into a data-driven technologically advanced group of businesses.
    • By digitising documents, and embracing digital concepts such as cloud, AI and crowdsourcing, they’ve kept abreast of customer need while also driving innovation.
    • The history of these companies show how embracing digital disruption intelligently can lead straight to the benefits of transformation.

    Click here to read the entire story at digitalpulse.

     

     

  • FTDNA Summer Sale

    All of FTDNA's tests are on sale during the month of August but remember that our Phillips DNA Project is based on tests of the male Y chromosome only. I recommend the 37 marker Y-DNA test that is on sale for $129 until August 31st. Here is a link to a page where you can order the test through our Phillips DNA Project:

    https://www.familytreedna.com/group-join.aspx?Group=Phillips

     

  • Archaeologists will conduct DNA analysis on 16th century Jamestown skeleton

    “We think this is the [one of the] first governors of Virginia,” said David Givens, director of archaeology for Jamestown Rediscovery. “So we’re going to spend the next six or seven months trying to prove ourselves wrong.”  Click here to read the whole story in Williamsburg Yorktown Daily.

  • Do Siblings have the same DNA?

    How can full siblings have different ethnicities when they have the same parents? Click here to find out in an article on Genealogy Explained.

  • Genealogists turn to DNA and Family Trees to crack cold cases

    Genealogical sleuthing techniques that are old to a handful of genealogists but new to most law enforcement have led to arrests in Washington State and Pennsylvania and unearthed a lead in a 37-year-old murder in Texas. All three cases were only revived when crime scene DNA was uploaded to GEDMatch, the same open-source ancestry site used in the Golden State killer case. Click here to read more in The New York Times.

  • Free DNA tests help reunite migrant children with parents

    MyHeritage just announced that, following the recent separation of immigrant parents and children in the United States, MyHeritage is expanding its pro-bono initiative, which helps reunite adoptees with their biological families through DNA testing — to help those parents who were detained at the US border reunite with their children. Click here to read more in Dick Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter.

  • DNA: Heredity or Hoax?

    A Toronto-based laboratory that tests people's DNA to determine their ancestry has been caught providing "proof" of such ancestry, even when the DNA sample came from a non-human. Here is a link to the story in Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter.

  • FTDNA's Father's Day Sale

    Family Tree DNA's traditional Father's Day Sale starts today and ends June 18th. Be sure to order your test test through our Phillips DNA Project at this link.

    Y-DNA111 was $359.00   now  $299.00
    Y-DNA37 was $169.00   now  $129.00
    Y-DNA67 was $268.00   now  $219.00
    Big Y was $649.00   now  $499.00

     

    If you have already tested at FTDNA and want to upgrade your test, here are the sale prices for upgrades:


    Y-12 to Y-37:     $69
    Y-25 to Y 37:     $35
    Y-37 to Y-67:     $79
    Y-37 to Y-111:   $168
    Y-67 to Y-111:    $99

     
  • Member tests in progress at FTDNA

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 05/28/2018

     

    Due Date,      Batch #,        Kit #,              Type of Test

     

    06/11/18         782                 89255             mtDNA Full Sequence

    06/11/18         851                 B255590        mtDNA Full Sequence

    06/13/18         689                 71714             Family Finder

    06/18/18         841                 191795           Y-DNA 67

    06/18/18         841                 288896           mtDNA Full Sequence

    06/20/18         854                 N4244            Family Finder

    06/25/18         859                 493656           Family Finder

    06/27/18         854                 622891           mtDNA Plus

    07/04/18         854                 802854           Big Y

    07/09/18         855                 231510           Y-DNA 111

    07/09/18         855                 318116           Y-DNA 111

    07/11/18         860                 623733           Y-DNA 37

    07/16/18         857                 847749           Y-DNA 37     

     

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of single tandem repeat markers found on a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test of single nucleotide polymorphism markers designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

     

  • Member tests in progress at FTDNA

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 05/28/2018

     

    Due Date,      Batch #,        Kit #,              Type of Test

     

    06/11/18         782                 89255             mtDNA Full Sequence

    06/11/18         851                 B255590        mtDNA Full Sequence

    06/13/18         689                 71714             Family Finder

    06/18/18         841                 191795           Y-DNA 67

    06/18/18         841                 288896           mtDNA Full Sequence

    06/20/18         854                 N4244            Family Finder

    06/25/18         859                 493656           Family Finder

    06/27/18         854                 622891           mtDNA Plus

    07/04/18         854                 802854           Big Y

    07/09/18         855                 231510           Y-DNA 111

    07/09/18         855                 318116           Y-DNA 111

    07/11/18         860                 623733           Y-DNA 37

    07/16/18         857                 847749           Y-DNA 37     

     

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of single tandem repeat markers found on a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test of single nucleotide polymorphism markers designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

     

  • The Casualties of GDPR

    Some genetic genealogy websites are going "dark" (ie, off line) because of the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation which is going into effect on May 25th. One of the casualties is Y-Search. Click here to read more on blog written by Judy Russell. The Phillips DNA Project is not going dark but we will be carefully monitoring the effects of GDPR and we have instituted new Terms of Service. Please take the time to read our new Terms of Service.

  • 23andMe sues Ancestry

    23andMe sued rival Ancestry.com on Friday May 11 in a California federal district court, alleging infringement of its patented method of identifying relatives in a database and of false advertising. The company also asked the court to nullify the trademarked "ancestry" logotype. Click here to read more at genome.net.

  • In Hunt for Golden State Killer

    Here's a link to a story that explains how autosomal DNA was used to find the Golden State Killer. Please note that the police used an open-source database where people voluntarily upload their autosomal DNA to look for matches. If you do not want your DNA to be used to trace violent killers and murderers, do not upload your DNA results to websites that can be accessed by everyone.

  • DNA Day Sale at FTDNA

    Family Tree DNA is holding a sale on all of their DNA tests through April 28th. Please note that our Phillips DNA Project is based exclusively on Y-DNA tests of men who have the Phillips surname. FTDNA's Family Finder test and mtDNA tests will not work for the purposes of our project. Here is a link to a page at FTDNA where you can order any of their DNA tests at the sales price.

  • Online Dating Based On DNA

    Here is a link to a website called DNA Romance that says it provides evidence-based matchmaking based on DNA chemistry and personality compatibility. According to this website:

    "We decipher the essential elements behind chemical attraction "chemistry" as forecasted using our DNA matchmaking algorithm and personality compatibility as calculated using your Myers-Briggs personality type."

  • Siblings can have surprising different autosomal DNA

    Here is a link to an article at National Geographic that explains why siblings can have different autosomal DNA. Although the word is never mentioned in this article, it is about AUTOSOMAL DNA. Mitochrondial DNA (mtDNA) and Y chromosome DNA (Y-DNA) does not combine with any other DNA so those two types of DNA do not dilute from generation to generation. Your mtDNA will be almost exactly the same as your mother's mtDNA, and if you are male, your Y-DNA will be almost exactly the same as your father's Y-DNA.

  • Autosomal DNA testing for genealogy

    Here is a link to a blog written by Amy Johnson Crow concerning things everyone should know before they take an autosomal DNA test. Please note Amy is writing about AUTOSOMAL DNA testing, not Y-DNA testing. Our Phillips DNA Project is based on Y-DNA testing.

  • Expected Relationships with Y-DNA STR Matches

     

     

  • Conflicting results from different companies

    Sometimes people get different haplogroup predictions from different companies. The reason for conflicting results depends on the test performed by the various companies.

    One company may be providing a haplogroup prediction based on STR (short tandem repeat) results and another company may be using SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) results. The results from SNP tests are more definitive than STR tests.

    It may also be that both companies did some SNP testing, but it was not at the same level (depth).

  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 03/03/2018

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    03/12/2018, 821, IN16219, Y-DNA 111

    03/19/2018, 831, 820370, Y-DNA 12

    03/26/2018, 833, 827957, Y-DNA 12

    03/26/2018, 833, 825732, Y-DNA 37

    02/26/2018, 833, 826305, Y-DNA 37

    03/28/2018, 834, 829511, Y-DNA 37

    04/04/2018, 836, 81860, Y-DNA 37


     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of single tandem repeat markers found on a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test of single nucleotide polymorphism markers designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

     

  • What is the likelihood of a non-paternal event or false paternity?

    It is thought that the rate of unannounced adoption or false paternity is about 1 – 3% per generation and compounds with each generation. When confirming your lineage, we recommend that you test yourself and your most distantly related male ancestor to verify the line back to the common male ancestor.

  • How many ancestors do you have?

    According to an article by Dick Eastman in his Online Genealogy Newsletter, if you go back 40 generations, you have 2,199,023,255,550 ancestors. The problem: that is far more people than have ever lived on the face of the earth. How is that possible? Here is a link to Dick's article that explains what is commonly called a collapsing pedigree.

  • When comparing genetic distance between men, which is more important to look at, SNPs or STRs?

    SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) offer a definitive answer to a potential relationship. When one person is positive (derived) for a SNP and the other person is negative (ancestral) for the same SNP, they are not related in genealogical times.

    On the other hand, if both men have matching SNP results, their STR (short tandem repeat) marker results determine how recently they are related.

  • Which DNA test should I take?

    Here's a link to an informative article written by Debbie Kennett that appeared in the May 2017 edition of Who Do You Think Your Are? Magazine.

  • FTDNA's Big Y Test

    The Big Y product is a Y-chromosome direct paternal lineage test. It is designed to explore deep ancestral links on the common paternal tree. Big Y tests thousands of known branch markers as well as millions of places where there may be new branch markers. This product is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science. However, it is not a test for matching you to one or more men with the same surname in the way that FTDNA's other Y-DNA tests do.

  • What does each STR marker mean?

    By themselves, Y-chromosome DNA (Y-DNA) short tandem repeat (STR) markers from a Y-DNA test do not have any particular meaning. The value of testing Y-DNA STR markers comes from creating a Y-DNA signature (haplotype) with them and comparing that Y-DNA signature to others in a database. They are useful for genetic genealogy because your Y-DNA signature distinguishes your paternal lineage from others.

  • DNA tests in progress

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 12/28/2017

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    01/01/2018, 804, 259717, Y-DNA 67

    01/01/2018, 804, N73727, R1b M222 SNP Pack

    01/01/2018, 808, 20699, Family Finder

    01/08/2018, 782, 89255, MT-DNA Full Sequence

    01/10/2018, 689, 71714, Family Finder

    01/31/2018, 814, 26404, Y-DNA 111

    01/31/2018, 814, 26404, Y-DNA 111

    02/01/2018, 806, 208358, Big Y

    02/07/2018, 816, 307773, Y-DNA 111

    02/07/2018, 816, 12069, Y-DNA-111

    02/28/2018, 814, 152954, Big Y

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of single tandem repeat markers found on a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test of single nucleotide polymorphism markers designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

     

  • Irish Ancestry Surprises Revealed by New DNA Map

    A new "DNA atlas" of Ireland is revealing some of the surprising ways historic kingdoms have influenced populations on the island—and it offers the first genetic evidence that Vikings intermingled with ancient Irish peoples. Click here to read the entire story in National Geographic.

  • Startling Discovery about Ancient St. Nicholas Relic

    Since it is the Christmas season, here is a link to an interesting article about St. Nicholas, the fourth-century Christian bishop whose generosity inspired the legend of Santa Claus.

  • The Genealogy of Meghan Markle

    Here is a link to an article about the genealogy of Prince Harry's future bride, Meghan Markle, on the Daily Beast.

  • How many generations does a Y-DNA test trace?

    Y-chromosome DNA (Y-DNA) tests trace both recent and distant generations. The number of generations traced by a Y-chromosome DNA test depends on the type of test taken, short tandem repeat (STR) or single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP).

    STR tests are able to trace a male lineage within genealogical times and into historic times. Your genealogical connections will be shown on the Y-DNA – Matches page of your myFTDNA account. The Y-DNA – Ancestral Origins page of your myFTDNA account will point towards possible countries of origin.

    On the other hand, Y-DNA SNP tests (Family Finder tests) are able to trace both ancient anthropological migrations and more recent prehistoric movements. A Y-DNA SNP test also identifies the haplogroup, which represents your deep ancestral origins (tens of thousands of years ago).

  • FTDNA Holiday Sale

    Family Tree DNA just announced a sale on their most popular tests and upgrades which will run until December 31st. Here are the tests and upgrades that are on sale. Remember to order any new tests through our Phillips DNA Project so that your results will be included in the project. Here is a link to a page where you can order your test through our project: 
    https://www.familytreedna.com/group-join.aspx?Group=Phillips

  • What do people often get wrong about genetics and DNA?

    How genetics is poised to change our world and is literally changing it right now. Click here to read the article in Forbes.

  • Tests in Progress at FTDNA

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 10/22/2017

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    10/30/2017, 782, 76446, MT-Full Sequence

    10/30/2017, 782, 201688, Y-DNA 111

    10/30/2017, 782, 229498, Y-DNA 111

    10/30/2017, 782, 288896, Big Y

    11/01/2017, 689, 71714, Family Finder

    11/06/2017, 776, 241057, Big Y

    11/06/2017, 788, 344757, Family Finder and MT-DNA Plus and Y-DNA 111

    11/06/2017, 776, 394204, Family Finder

    11/06/2017, 786, 757435, MT-Full Sequence

    11/06/2017, 790, 770389, Y-DNA 37

    11/06/2017, 743, B120736, Big Y

    11/08/2017, 744, 26404, Big Y

    11/13/2017, 778, 12069, Y102 SNP

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of single tandem repeat markers found on a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test of single nucleotide polymorphism markers designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

     

  • Bible records at the DAR

    The DAR website lists 237 bible records that include the name Phillips. Here is a link to the page that displays those records. Thanks to member Doyle Phillips for this tip.

  • Should I test more Y-DNA markers?

    You should test more Y-chromosome DNA short tandem repeat (STR) markers when you wish to compare additional markers against others with similar results. They will refine your matches for genealogical purposes. It does not increase the number of generations traced by a Y-DNA STR test but rather reduces the range of generations in the time to a common ancestor with your match.

    Testing additional STR markers can also help refine the matches in the Y-DNA – Ancestral Origins page. Testing more markers means that the information is more relevant to your personal ancestry. However, information on deeper origins (historical and anthropological) may be better answered with an extended Y-DNA SNP test like the Geno 2.0 test.

    If you do not have many matches or do not have many matches that have tested more markers, you may still choose to upgrade. That way as the database grows and you gain additional matches, you will be prepared to make comparisons that are more refined. Note that the Y-DNA111 is new enough that matching and information from matching may be limited by FTDNA's current database size.  This test is becoming more popular and the database is growing rapidly, so this should change over time.

  • Detectable autosomal DNA

    What is the probability that my relative and I share enough autosomal DNA for testing to detect?

    If your relationship is within recent generations (2nd cousins or more recent relatives), testing is almost sure to detect your relationship. Testing will also detect many 3rd cousins and about half of your 4th cousins. It will only detect a small percentage of 5th and more distant cousins. This is because you share an average of 50% less DNA with an ancestor with each additional generation. Here is a chart that shows how much autosomal DNA you can expect to share with different levels of cousins.

  • My Y-DNA close match is not showing in my Family Finder matches, why?

    If your Y-chromosome DNA (Y-DNA) match is not on your Family Finder match list, it may be that the match did not take the Family Finder test. Matches do not work across databases. You may check this on your Y-DNA match list by looking for FF or Family Finder next to the match’s name. If FF or Family Finder is displayed, then your match has taken the Family Finder test. If both you and your Y-DNA match have taken the Family Finder test but do not match, it means that your relationship is unlikely to be within the past five generations.

  • DNA and DAR Applications

    The Daughters of the American Revolution now accepts Y-DNA evidence in support of new member applications and supplemental applications. In addition, you can save $30 on a Y-DNA 37 marker test at Family Tree DNA if you order your test through the DAR. Here is a link to a page on the DAR website that gives more information.

  • Autosomal vs Y-DNA Testing

    Here's a link to a blog at Family Tree Magazine that discusses the merits of Y-DNA versus autosomal DNA testing:

    https://www.familytreemagazine.com/premium/autosomal-vs-ydna-testing/

     

  • Member tests in progress at FTDNA

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 08/17/2017

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    08/30/2017, 769, N139132, Y-DNA 37

    09/04/2017, 770, 722941, Y-DNA 67

    09/06/2017, 771, 566310, y-DNA 12

    09/11/2017, 776, 394204, Y-DNA 67

    09/18/2017, 774, 684352, Y-DNA 67

    09/20/2017, 775, 736852, Y-DNA 37

    09/27/2017, 777, 77643, Y-DNA 67

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of single tandem repeat markers found on a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test of single nucleotide polymorphism markers designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

     

  • Autosomal vs Y-DNA Testing

    Here is a link to an article in Family Tree Magazine written by Blaine Bettinger comparing and contrasting autosomal DNA testing with Y-DNA testing. I recommend everyone considering taking a DNA test for genealogy to read this article.

  • Friends and Family Sale

    Family Tree DNA is discounting prices on their most popular tests including upgrades all through the month of August. Prices are as follows:


    If you are ordering a new test, be sure to order it through our Phillips DNA Project at this link so that you will be included in the project:

    https://www.familytreedna.com/group-join.aspx?Group=Phillips

  • Who was she? A DNA test only opened new mysteries

    About half of Alice Plebuch’s autosomal DNA results presented the mixed British Isles bloodline she expected. The other half picked up an unexpected combination of European Jewish, Middle Eastern and Eastern European. Surely someone in the lab had messed up. It was the early days of direct-to-consumer DNA testing, and Ancestry.com’s test was new. She wrote the company a nasty letter informing them they’d made a mistake. Click here to read the entire story in the Washington Post and thanks to member Bob Phillips for pointing out this interesting article.

  • Arthritis is the price for our ancestors surviving the Ice Age

    Researchers have discovered that a gene mutation which increases the risk of arthritis evolved in the Ice Age to help protect our ancestors from frostbite. Click here to read more in the Telegraph.

  • That Y-DNA Lament

    Click here to read an article by Judy G. Russell about why you might not have any close Y-DNA matches.

  • DNA discovery reveals genetic history of ancient Egyptians

    Analyzing samples spanning over a millennium, researchers looked for genetic differences compared with Egyptians today. They found that the sample set showed a strong connection with a cluster of ancient non-African populations based east of the Mediterranean Sea.  Click here to read the entire story at cnn.com.

  • Tests in Progress at FTDNA

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 6/21/2017

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    06/28/2017, 689, 71714, Family Finder

    07/03/2017, 751, 644829, Family Finder

    07/05/2017, 752, 698272, Y-DNA 111

    07/17/2017, 755, 704877, Y-DNA 37

    07/24/2017, 753, 635998, Y-DNA 37

    07/24/2017, 758, 583082, Y-DNA 37

     

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of single tandem repeat markers found on a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test of single nucleotide polymorphism markers designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

     

  • How Many of You Are There?

    Here is a link to a fun website that shows you how many people in the United States have exactly the same first and last name that you do.  This does not have much to do with genealogy or DNA but it is interesting nonetheless.

  • FTDNA Father's Day Sale

    Family Tree DNA is offering their 37 marker Y-DNA test for the reduced price of $139 from June 6th to June 18th.  Click here to order a test kit through our Phillips DNA Project which will guarantee your results will be included in our project.  Please remember that only men can take a Y-DNA test since only men have a Y chromosome.

  • Navigating Y-DNA at FTDNA

    Hundreds of thousands of genealogists have turned to Y-DNA testing to aid in their genealogical efforts. However, after completing the test, many are faced with more questions than answers.  Click here to view a 56 minute free recording of "Navigating Y-DNA at Family Tree DNA".

  • Finding Lisa: A story of murders, mysteries, loss, and, incredibly, new life

    Lisa never stopped wondering who she was or where she came from. Who were her biological parents? Were they still alive?

    Two years ago, she embarked in earnest on a quest for her identity, joining millions of others who have turned to DNA databases to trace their roots. Law enforcement officials and genealogists alike would join the search, determined to help Lisa find her place in the world.

    Click here to read the entire, fascinating story in the Boston Globe.

  • Most French Canadians are descended from 800 women

    To help fix New France's gender imbalance, two men came up with an innovative idea to import young women to the colony to marry male settlers. Almost all of the women were poor and many were orphans.  Two-thirds of today's French-Canadians can trace their ancestry back to one of these 800 women who were known as the Filles du Roi or "Daughters of the King".  Click here to read more in "Canada: The Story of Us".

  • WDYTYA? LIVE to close its doors

    The UK's largest family history event comes to an end after ten years.  Immediate Media, the organizers of the annual event, reached the difficult decision this week due to financial reasons.  Click here to read more in WDYTYA Magazine.

  • Member tests in progress at FTDNA

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 4/27/2017

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    05/03/2017, 689, 71714, Family Finder

    05/10/2017, 727, 644829, Y-DNA 67

    05/24/2017, 737, 341870, Y-DNA 111

    06/05/2017, 743, 665614, Y-DNA 25

    06/19/2017, 743, B120736, Big Y

    06/21/2017, 744, 26404, Big Y

     

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of single tandem repeat markers found on a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test of single nucleotide polymorphism markers designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

     

  • National DNA Day Sale

    Starting today, April 20th, Family Tree DNA is reducing prices on their best-selling DNA tests for one week only to celebrate National DNA Day.  Here is a link to a page at FTDNA where you can order a test kit through our Phillips DNA Project.  Although most of their DNA tests are on sale, please remember that our Phillips DNA Project is based on Y-DNA test results only.

  • Distribution of European Y-DNA haplogroups

    Here is a link to a website that lists the percentages of different haplogroups found in various European countries.  The figures are only indicative and several sources were used and averages recalculated by merging the data available.

  • German DNA research project

    Living DNA and the Computer Genealogy Association (CompGen), the largest genealogical association in Germany, work together with leading academics, researchers and genealogists and need your help.

    Together we want to map the genetic origins of the world as precisely as possible geographically.The extended database, which is derived from it, basically allows all people of the world to determine their own individual descent and their relationship with the rest of mankind even more precisely.

    Our preliminary research has identified up to 24 regions in Germany where we expect significant genetic differences. If your ancestors were born within today's Germany or in one of the former Eastern territories (Silesia, Posen, Pomerania, East and West Prussia), then you are eligible for our project.

    Click here to participate in the German DNA Project.

  • England's Immigrants Database

    Here is a link to a fully searchable database containing over 64,000 names of people known to have migrated to England between 1330 and 1550.

  • East Asians are genetically similar to their ancient ancestors

    For the first time, scientists have been able to extract DNA from ancient East Asian bones and compare it to the DNA of the people there today. It turns out that modern East Asians, unlike Europeans, are very genetically similar to their ancestors — and this information tells us more about the origins of farming and how populations migrated or stayed put. Click here to read the entire article in The Verge.

  • DNA Suggests a Maternal "Dynasty" in Ancient Southwest Society

    More than a century after the discovery of an ancient crypt loaded with turquoise and other riches in New Mexico’s Chaco Canyon, scientists have analyzed DNA from the remains of 14 people buried there. What they found is surprising evidence of a matrilineal society, where power and influence appear to have been passed down through the female line.  Click here to read the whole story in History.com.

  • Member tests in progress at FTDNA

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 3/01/2017

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    03/08/2017, 707, 259755, L193 SNP Pack

    03/08/2017, 717, 631341, Y-DNA 37

    03/20/2017, 689, 71714, Family Finder

    03/22/2017, 721, 634957, Y-DNA 37

    03/27/2017, 722, 601483, Y-DNA 37

    04/03/2017, 724, 643083, Y-DNA 37

    04/10/2017, 726, B120736, Y-DNA 67

     

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of single tandem repeat markers found on a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test of single nucleotide polymorphism markers designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

     

  • The Y-Chromosome in Forensic and Public Health Genetics

    Here is a link to another highly technical but interesting article on the male Y-chromosome.

  • Clustering of 770,000 genomes reveals post-colonial population structure of North America

    Here is a link to a technical but interesting article on nature.com.  I thought the finding of reduced north-south gene flow especially interesting and it matches what we have found in our Phillips DNA Project - ie, very little mixture between Northern Phillips families and Southern Phillips Families.

  • DNA section on the Guild of One-Name Studies' website

    The Guild of One-Name Studies has added a DNA section to their website with lots of useful information about DNA testing and surname projects including an article that we wrote about the Phillips DNA Project.  Here is a link to the new page.

  • Adopted man identifies birth father thru FTDNA test

    Here is a link to an interesting video by a man who used DNA testing to learn the surname of his biological father.  Thanks to member Doyle Phillips for this tip.

  • Dust to dust: Scientists Find DNA of Human Ancestors in Cave Floor Dirt

    Imagine being able to collect the DNA of a human ancestor who's been dead for tens of thousands of years from the dirt on the floor of a cave. Sounds fantastic, but scientists in Germany think they may be able to do just that. If they're successful, it could open a new door into understanding the extinct relatives of humans.  Read more at this link.

  • DNA analysis proves Arabs aren't entirely Arab

    The National Geographic's Genographic project gives us surprising information about Arab genetic makeup.  Here is a link to the story on stepfeed.com.

  • Member tests in progress at FTDNA

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 1/9/2017

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    01/25/2017, 689, 71714, Family Finder

    01/25/2017, 701, 74772, L21v2 SNP Pack

    02/01/2017, 706, 19622, mtFull Sequence

    02/08/2017, 707, 26200, Y-DNA 67 + Family Finder

    02/08/2017, 709, 65267, Family Finder

    02/08/2017, 707, 259755, L193 SNP Pack

    02/08/2017, 707, B137498, mtDNA Plus

    02/15/2017, 708, 82751, FGC494 SNP Pack

    02/15/2017, 708, B5666, V68 SNP Pack

    02/22/2017, 709, 22919, Y-DNA 37

    02/22/2017, 709, 466536, Y-DNA 37

    02/27/2017, 710, 252748, Y-DNA 67

    02/27/2017, 710, 606103, mtFull Sequence + Y-DNA 25

     

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of single tandem repeat markers found on a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test of single nucleotide polymorphism markers designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

  • Debunking pseudogenetics

    Here is a link to an interesting lecture given a few weeks ago by Dr. Jennifer Raff who has published rather extensively on Native American DNA.  In this lecture, she talks about pseudoscience and pseudogenetics which is used to construct genetic myths including ones about the existence of Sasquatch.

  • Irish Clans and Surnames

    Clans and Surnames will take place in Nenagh, Co. Tipperary from May 15 - 19. 2017 at the Great National Abbey Court Hotel.. Packages include classes, workshops and lectures and it helps those who are putting their family histories together, researching Irish ancestry and making sense of sources.  Click here to read more.

  • Introduction to DNA for Genealogists

    Here is a link to a lecture by Jim Rader on You Tube which he delivered at Roots Tech in January of 2016.  This is an excellent introduction describing how to use DNA for genealogy.

  • Are you related to Edward III?

    The BBC series 'Who do you think you are?' has traced the ancestors of the actor Danny Dyer, famous for parts in many films.  ISOGG member Andrew Millard discusses the probabilities of being descended from Edward III like Danny Dyer.  This also provides a good summary of the problem of pedigree collapse.  Click here to listen to this program on BBC Radio.

  • Skeletal shock for Norwegian researchers at Viking hunting

    The riddle of the Viking chief Rollo’s rise remains unresolved. Norwegian researchers tested skeletal remains that were supposed to be from his descendants, but that have turned out to be far older than Rollo.  Click here to read more in Norway Today.

  • FTDNA's 2016 Holiday Sale

    In the spirit of the holidays, Family Tree DNA has slashed prices on most of their most popular products.  Here is a link to a page where you can order a 37 marker Y-DNA test through our Phillips DNA Project for the sales price of $139.00:

    https://www.familytreedna.com/group-join.aspx?Group=Phillips

    Please remember that our project is based on tests of the male Y chromosome, so if you order something else, we cannot use it in our project.

     

  • DNA tests in progress

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 11/06/2016

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    11/23/2016, 694, 250714, R1b-DF49xM222 SNP Pack

    11/23/2016, 695, Y-DNA 37 & mtDNA Plus

    11/30/2016, 689, 71714, Family Finder

    11/30/2016, 697, 527422, mtFull Sequence

    12/07/2016, 698, 441822, I2-L596 SNP Pack

    12/14/2016, 699, N73727, R1b-M343 Backbone SNP Pack

    12/21/2016, 700, 532695, Y-DNA 25

    12/21/2016, 700, 369346, R1b-Z192 SNP Pack

    12/21/2016, 700, 558353, Y-DNA 37 & Family Finder

    12/21/2016, 700, 563104, Y-DNA 37

    12/28/2016, 701, 74772, R1b L21v2 SNP Pack

    12/28/2016, 701, 76670, Y-DNA 67

     

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of single tandem repeat markers found on a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test of single nucleotide polymorphism markers designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

  • King Richard III - the resolution of a 500-year-old mystery

    Richard III, the protagonist in Shakespeare's play of the same name, is the focus of this year's Queen's Lecture. In August 2012, the University of Leicester in collaboration with the Richard III Society and Leicester City Council, began one of the most ambitious archaeological projects ever attempted: no less than a search for the lost grave of King Richard III. The last English king to die in battle.

    Turi King led the international research team which provided overwhelming evidence that the skeleton discovered under a car park in Leicester indeed represents the remains of King Richard III, thereby closing what is probably the oldest forensic case solved to date.

    At this year’s Queen’s Lecture, Turi King will speak about the Grey Friars project, from the early stages of planning the dig, through to the excavation and the results of the various strands of analysis carried out on the remains and modern DNA obtained from a straight descendant of Anne of York, Richard III’s eldest sister.

    Click here to watch the live stream on 1 November.  The lecture will be held in English.

  • DNA may crack a 17th century cold case

    Back in August, crews working on part of Leine castle uncovered a long-dead skeleton. Early analysis of the remains by researchers at Lund University indicates that the bones are centuries old, which could put them in the running to be Königsmarck’s long-lost body. However, there could be an answer soon—scientists at the university are working on ways to extract DNA samples from the bones in hopes of comparing it with samples from Königsmarck’s living relatives to see if they can make a match.  Read more here in Smithsonian.com.



  • DNA is helping Irish people find their ancestors from centuries ago

    MAURICE GLEESON MB is a London-based doctor during the day, but when he’s not working the Irishman is delving deep into his family’s history, using DNA.

    He’s gearing up to speak at the Back to our Past event next weekend, an event set up for those who want trace their family’s past.

    Click here to read more in The Journal.ie.

  • Fact-Checking Family Folklore with DNA Tests

    Americans are digging up surprises about their immigrant ancestors using DNA testing and online genealogy research.  Click here to read more in The Wall Street Journal.

  • DNA from the deep?

    Site has already revealed most spectacular cargo ever found from antiquity, but bones are first hope of sequencing DNA from 1st century BC shipwreck victim.  Click here to read more in The Guardian.

  • Tests in progress

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 09/07/2016

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    09/21/2016, 654, 39556, Family Finder & Y-DNA 111

    09/28/2016, 682, 369497, Y-DNA 67

    09/28/2016, 688, 527402, Y-DNA 67

    10/05/2016, 689, 71714, Family Finder

    10/12/2016, 691, 109492, Family Finder

    10/12/2016, 692, 231384, Family Finder

    10/12/2016, 692, 252748, Family Finder

    10/12/2016, 691, 539491, Family Finder

    10/19/2016, 691, 45295, DF13

    10/19/2016, 689, 441821, Mt-DNA Plus

     

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of single tandem repeat markers found on a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test of single nucleotide polymorphism markers designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

  • Was Christopher Columbus the son of a Polish king?

    Christopher Columbus was the son of a Polish king living in exile in Madeira and hid his royal roots to protect his father, a new book claims.  The next step is to try and prove Columbus' royal heritage by extracting DNA from the tombs of Polish kings to compare with that of the explorer's son who is buried in Seville Cathedral.  Click here to read more in The Telegraph.

  • DNA tests helpful but genealogical research still necessary

    "DNA testing has become an accepted tool for identifying ancestors and for verifying genealogical leads," according to genealogical website Familysearch.org. "It is also used frequently to learn about our deep ancestry." It's also defined as genetic genealogy, described on Wikipedia.org as "the use of DNA testing in combination with... traditional genealogical and historical records to infer relationships between individuals."  Click here to read more in an article published in the Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette.

  • DNA hunters open Viking grave in Normandy

    A Norwegian-led delegation was in Normandy on Monday and opened the sarcophagus of two of Rollo’s descendants, a grandson and a great grandson. The aim is to use DNA to put an end to a centuries-long debate: Was Rollo Danish or Norwegian?  Click here to read more in Norway Today.

  • FTDNA's Sizzlin' Summer Sale!

    Summer in Houston means relentless heat. Ruthless sunshine punctuated by the occasional thunderstorm. The hum of air conditioner compressors is the season’s soundtrack.

    You know what else it means?

    Yep. You got it. It means the Sizzlin’ Summer Sale is about to launch!

    This summer the focus is on bundles that include Family Finder: Y37 + Family Finder, Y67 + Family Finder, FMS + Family Finder, and Comprehensive Genome (FF+Y67+FMS). The prices are in the chart below.

    But wait - there’s more!

    The heat must have gotten to Bennett because the only individual test he’s reduced pricing on is Family Finder, which will be $69. You read that right. $69 US DOLLARS!

    (For those of you who are new and may not be aware, Bennett Greenspan is the founder and president of FTDNA.)

    Not only has he set the Family Finder price ridiculously low, but he’s not giving us an end date for this sale. It could last a few days or a few weeks - we don’t know and he’s not telling!

    So what we’re saying is, take advantage of these great prices while they’re hot!

    Here’s the pricing: 

    Product

    Retail Price

    Sale Price

    Group Price

    Family Finder

    $99

    $69

    $69

    Y37 + Family Finder

    $268

    $228

    $218

    Y67 + Family Finder

    $367

    $327

    $317

    Comprehensive Genome (FF+Y67+FMS)

    $566

    $499

    $489

    FMS + Family Finder

    $298

    $258

    $258

     

    **Please note - these bundles must remain bundles. If you buy at the sale price for future use, the entire bundle must be used on one tester. Canceling tests from the bundle will cause tests to revert to regular price.

    ***Please also note that the Phillips DNA Project is a Y-DNA project and we cannot use your Family Finder results to identify your Phillips family group.  Here is a link to a page where you can order an FTDNA test through our Phillips DNA Project:

    https://www.familytreedna.com/group-join.aspx?Group=Phillips

  • How British are you?

    The average Briton is only 37% British with the remainder of their genes coming from European ancestors as far afield as Scandinavia, Spain and Greece.  Click here to read the entire story in the Daily Mail.

  • How slavery changed the DNA of African Americans

    Widespread sexual exploitation before the Civil War strongly influenced the genetic make-up of essentially all African Americans alive today.  Click here to read more in the Pacific Standard.

  • Discovery of Philistine cemetery

    Scholars of the period differ as to the geographical origins of the Philistines, with mainland Greece, the islands of Crete or Cyprus, and Anatolia in modern-day Turkey considered. The expedition team is now performing DNA, radiocarbon and other tests on the remains in an attempt to pinpoint their provenance.  Click here to read more in BBC News.

  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 06/30/2016

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    07/13/2016, 654, 39556, Family Finder & Y-DNA 111

    08/03/2016, 683, 176858, Z156

    08/10/2016, 683, 267120, Family Finder & Y-DNA 67

    08/17/2016, 682, 347740, Y-DNA 111

    08/17/2016, 682, 369497, Y-DNA 67

    08/17/2016, 682, 516229, Y-DNA 37

    08/17/2016, 682, B5666, V13

    08/24/2016, 683, 369346, R1b-U152 SNP Pack

    08/24/2016, 683, 404979, R1b-M343 SNP Pack

    08/24/2016, 681, 425082, Y-DNA 37

    08/24/2016, 683, 487899, Family Finder &Y-DNA 37

     

     EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of single tandem repeat markers found on a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test of single nucleotide polymorphism markers designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

  • Accountant wins legal claim to baronetcy

    A retired accountant from Buckinghamshire is to be made a baronet in a landmark ruling set to shake the foundations of the British system of hereditary titles by opening them up to challenge through DNA tests for the first time. Click here to read more in The Telegraph.

  • Who's the real aristocrat?

    The Queen has commanded Britain’s most senior judges to decide if DNA evidence can be used for the first time to settle a dispute over a hereditary title, in a move that could have far-reaching consequences for the aristocracy.  Click here to read more in the Daily Mail.


  • FTDNA's Father's Day Sale

    As promised, Family Tree DNA is offering discounts on upgrade pricing during their Father's Day Sale. Starting at midnight tonight, June 15th, and ending on Monday,June 20th at 11:59 pm CDT, sale pricing for the discounted upgrades will be as follows:


    Y12-Y25

    $49

    $40

    Y12-Y37

    $99

    $79

    Y25-Y37

    $49

    $40

    Y37-Y67

    $99

    $79

    Y37-Y111

    $220

    $188

    Y67-Y11

    $129

    $109

    HVR1-FMS

    $159

    $139

    HVR2 (mtDNA Plus)-FMS

    $139

    $129

    In addition to the discounted upgrade pricing above, FTDNA will also have discounts on these select testing bundles:

     

    Y37 + Family Finder

    $268

    $218

    Y67 + Family Finder

    $367

    $288

    Comprehensive Genome (FF+Y67+FMS)

    $566

    $449


    Please note that while invoiced orders (Bill me later option) can be placed during the sale, FTDNA will only be able to honor the sale price for those orders if they are paid by the end of the sale.  Click here to order your test through the Phillips DNA Project: 

    https://www.familytreedna.com/group-join.aspx?Group=Phillips

  • Ten matches in DNA research into primal Oldenzaal

    In the town of Oldenzaal in the Netherlands, 30,000 skeletons were dug up during an archaeological dig around an old church.  Archaeologists wondered if any modern Oldenzaalers would be related to any of these buried people.  Comparison of Y-DNA from the skeletons and 128 volunteers yielded 10 matches.  Click here to read a translated version of this story.  One of our members told me this link does not take him to a translated version, so you may have to click on the translate button which should appear in the upper right hand corner of the story.

  • The DNA of Dogs

    For years, scientists have debated where dogs came from. Did wolves first forge their special relationship with humans in Europe, or in Asia? The answer, according to a new study, is yes. This week in Science, researchers report that genetic analysis of hundreds of canines reveals that dog may have been domesticated twice, once in Asia and once in Europe, although European ancestry has mostly vanished from today’s dogs. The findings could resolve a rift that has roiled the canine origins community—but the case isn’t 
closed yet.  Click here to read the whole story in Sciencemag.org.

  • Locate My Name

    Locate My Name is a website that promises to help you find distribution of names across countries and regions.  The site mainly focuses on surnames.  Click here to read more in Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter.

  • Three scenarios when Y-DNA is useful

    The Y chromosome DNA test, more affectionately referred to as the YDNA test, is the darling of the DNA testing industry. (At least, I think so.) In fact, of the three kinds of DNA tests, the YDNA is my favorite. It has several excellent qualities that make it useful in many genealogical scenarios, but let’s look at three.  Click here to continue reading Lisa Louise Cooke's Genealogy Gems.

  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 05/07/2016

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    06/01/2016, 654, 39556, Family Finder & Y-DNA 111

    06/01/2016, 672, 91742, Family Finder

    06/01/2016, 671, 492319, Y-DNA 37

    06/15/2016, 673, 288896, Y-DNA 111

    06/22/2016, 674, 347740, mtDNA Full Sequence

    07/06/2016, 674, 206072, Big Y

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of single tandem repeat markers found on a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test of single nucleotide polymorphism markers designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

  • Kennewick Man will be given a Native American burial

    The skeleton was found on federal land, so it technically fell under U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' control. But five Native American nations claimed that the "Ancient One” was in fact Native American and should be repatriated under NAGPRA. This assertion was controversial until a 2015 study showed that Kennewick Man was in fact Native American. Though the DNA evidence from this study didn't link him to a particular nation, it showed that his genome was more closely related to modern Native Americans than any other modern human in existence.

    Click here to read the entire story at Smithsonian.com.


  • DNA Day Sale at FTDNA

    National DNA Day is April 25th and FTDNA is celebrating by having a sale on most of its DNA tests.  The sale will run until midnight of Thursday April 26, so don't delay.  Here is a link to the home page of FTDNA and a list of sales prices:

     

    https://www.familytreedna.com/

     

    Product

    Retail Pricing

       Sale Price

    Family Finder

           $99

         $79

    mtFull Seq

          $199

        $149

    Y37

          $169

        $129

    Y67

          $268

        $199

    Y111

          $359

        $289

    BigY

          $575

        $460

    SNP Packs

          $119

        $109

  • Britons still live in tribal kingdoms

    Britons are still living in the same 'tribes' that they did in the 7th Century, Oxford University has found after an astonishing study into our genetic make-up.  Click here to read more in The Telegraph.

  • DNA points to Neanderthal breeding barrier

    Incompatibilities in the DNA of Neanderthals and modern humans may have limited the impact of interbreeding between the two groups.  Click here to read more in BBC news.

  • Ancestry unable to restore all of Rootsweb

    Ancestry has been trying for weeks to fix a data loss in its RootsWeb/USGenWeb/WorldConnect web pages. The company has been able to repair many of the lost pages but not all.  Click here to read more in Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter.

  • Discovery of old bones could change what we know about the Irish

    Ten years ago, an Irish pub owner was clearing land for a driveway when his digging exposed an unusually large flat stone. The stone obscured a dark gap underneath. He grabbed a flashlight to peer in.

    "I shot the torch in and saw the gentleman, well, his skull and bones," Bertie Currie, the pub owner, said this week.

    The remains of three humans, in fact, were found behind McCuaig’s Bar in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. And though police were called, it was not, as it turned out, a crime scene.

    Instead, what Currie had stumbled over was an ancient burial that, after a recent DNA analysis, challenges the traditional centuries-old account of Irish origins.

    Click here to continue reading this interesting story in The Washington Post.

  • Member DNA tests in progress at FTDNA

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 03/15/2016

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    04/06/2016, 654, 39556, Family Finder & Y-DNA 111

    04/06/2016, 656, 86314, DF27 SNP Pack

    04/06/2016, 663, 441794, Y-DNA 37

    04/13/2016, 662, 471729, Y-DNA 37

    04/20/2016, 663, 478265, Y-DNA 37

    04/27/2016, 664, 445856, Y-DNA 37

    04/27/2016, 665, B68114, Y-DNA 111

    05/11/2016, 666, 481770, Y-DNA 37

    05/18/2016, 667, 477610, Y-DNA 67

    05/18/2016, 667, 484751, Y-DNA 37

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of single tandem repeat markers found on a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test of single nucleotide polymorphism markers designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

  • Was Viking ruler Rollo Danish or Norwegian?

    Norwegian researchers opened a tomb containing the remains of descendants of Viking leader Rollo in Normandy, France on Monday with the aim of putting an end to a centuries-long debate: was Rollo Danish or Norwegian?  The researchers will attempt to obtain DNA from 8 teeth found in the tomb.  Click here to read more in The Local, Norway's news in English.

  • It's official: Native Americans and Siberians are cousins

    After more than a century of speculation, an international group of geneticists has conclusively proven that the Aztecs, Incas, and Iroquois are closely related to the peoples of Altai, the Siberian region that borders China and Mongolia.  Click here to read more in Russia Beyond The Headlines.

  • Iceman Reborn

    Watch as Otzi, a 5000-year-old mummy, is brought to life and preserved with 3D modeling.  Airing February 17, 2016 at 9 pm on PBS.

  • The Wetsuitman

    Last winter two bodies were found in Norway and the Netherlands.  They were wearing identical wetsuits.  The police in three countries were involved in the case, but never managed to identify them.  This is the story of how DNA proved who they were.  Read the entire story at this link.

  • New Family Tree Maker Options

    Last December, Ancestry.com announced that they were going to retire their Family Tree Maker software.  Probably due to a large outcry from their customers, Ancestry announced today that they have developed two options for desktop software that will work with Ancestry.  Here is a link to that announcement.

  • Iron Age and Anglo-Saxon genomes

    The present-day English owe about a third of their ancestry to the Anglo-Saxons, according to a new DNA study.  Click here to read more in BBC News and thanks to member John Phillips of England for this link.

  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 01/19/2016

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    01/06/2016, 649, 16800, Big Y

    02/10/2016, 654, 250714, Y-DNA 111

    02/10/2016, 654, 39556, Family Finder

    02/10/2016, 654, 115064, Y-DNA 111

    02/17/2016, 653, 229537, L47 SNP Pack

    03/02/2016, 659, 468762, Family Finder

    03/09/2016, 656, 69666, L21 SNP Pack

    03/09/2016, 656, 86314, DF27 SNP Pack

    03/09/2016, 657, 237386, Y-DNA 67

    03/09/2016, 657, 242917, Y-DNA 37

    03/28/2016, 658, 464334, Y-DNA 67

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is another direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

  • Who are the Picts?

    A recently discovered DNA marker suggests that 10% of Scottish men are directly descended from the Picts.  Click here to read more in Scotland in my Heart.

  • Ungrateful Phillips

    The following item was submitted by member Wayne Phillips:

    Description: Kills Man Who Saved His Life. PHILLIPS, ZURELBRY
    Date: September 20, 1913

    Newspaper published in: Abbeville, LA

    Taylorsport, Ky., - Lewis PHILLIPS fell into the Ohio river. He was unable to swim. William ZURELBRY, at the risk of his own life, plunged into the water and rescued PHILLIPS. Two hours later PHILLIPS appeared at ZURELBRY's home, armed with a shotgun. "Are you the man who saved my life?" he demanded. "Yes," replied his rescuer. PHILLIPS lifted the shotgun to his shoulder and without a word shot ZURELBRY dead.
     
    Click here to read the story in The New York Times.
  • Ancient DNA sheds light on Irish origins

    Scientists have sequenced the first ancient human genomes from Ireland, shedding light on the genesis of Celtic populations.  Click here to read more in Eurekalert and here to read more in BBC News.  Our thanks to members John and Doyle Phillips for sending these tips.

  • History of Surnames

    Here is a link to an interesting video on Youtube about the history of surnames.  Our thanks to member Doyle Phillips for supplying this link. 

  • Richard III DNA tests uncover further royal scandal

    The latest Y-DNA tests reveal another break in the male line, potentially undermining the legitimacy of the entire House of Plantagenet.  Click here to read more in The Guardian.

  • Your hair mites reflect your ancestry

    Most people would probably prefer to forget that their eyebrows are also shaggy ecosystems, home to scores of microscopic hair mites.  But a DNA analysis reveals that your mites are incredibly loyal to you - and that could help scientists trace ancient human migrations.  Click here to read the whole story in Smithsonian.com.

  • Ancestry to retire Family Tree Maker software

    Ancestry.com has decided to stop selling Family Tree Maker as of December 31, 2015.  Here is a link to their announcement.

  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 12/05/2015

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    12/23/2015, 647, 151873, Various SNPs

    01/06/2016, 649, 16800, Big Y

    01/13/2016, 650, 73458, Big Y and Y-DNA 111

    01/20/2016, 649, N73727, Y-DNA 111

    01/20/2016, 651, 208358, Y-DNA 111

    01/20/2016, 651, 241057, Z8 SNP Pack and Y-DNA 111

    01/20/2016, 651, 369346, Various SNPs

    01/27/2016, 650, 447611, Y-DNA 37

    02/10/2016, 652, 444029, Y-DNA 37

    02/10/2016, 652, 451062, Y-DNA 37

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is another direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

  • Why so many Americans think they're part Cherokee

    Today more Americans claim descent from at least one Cherokee ancestor than any other Native American group. Across the United States, Americans tell and retell stories of long-lost Cherokee ancestors.  Read more at http://www.businessinsider.com/why-so-many-americans-think-theyre-part-cherokee-2015-10

  • FTDNA's 2015 Holiday Sale

    Family Tree DNA has announced the launch of their 2015 Holiday Sale!  It will end on December 31st at 11:59 PM Central Time.  Here are the sale prices on various Y-DNA tests:

    Y-DNA 37 marker test for $139

    Y-DNA 67 marker test for $228

    Y-DNA 111 marker test for $309

    Click here to order a test through our Phillips DNA Project to make certain your results are added to our project.

  • Nancy Hanks Lincoln mtDNA Study

    A new study of the matrilineal kin of Abraham Lincoln's mother Nancy Hanks has demonstrated that Lincoln's mitochondrial DNA belonged to a very rare haplogroup X1c, and has provided evidence of the maternal ancestry of Nancy Hanks Lincoln.  Click here to read more about the results of the study.

  • Gates hoping to inspire love of STEM through Genealogy

    Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. hopes to trigger a love for science, technology and math among American students by turning them on to searching for their family roots.

    "We're going to teach them about Y-DNA if you're a man, how you get that from your father who got that marker from his father and his father," said Gates, referring to the Y chromosome. Students also will learn about mitochondrial DNA, "which you get from your mother and her mother and her mother, whether you're a man or a woman."

    Click here to read the entire story in ABC News.

  • Russia to exhume Alexander III

    Russian investigators said Monday that they will exhume the remains of Russian Tsar Alexander III to confirm the identity of two of his grandchildren, who were executed alongside their father, Tsar Nicholas II, by the Bolsheviks in 1918.  Click here to read the entire story in The Moscow Times.

  • DNA tests could settle title feud

    DNA evidence could be used for the first time to resolve a feud over a hereditary title after Queen Elizabeth intervenes.  Click here to read the entire story in the Telegraph.

  • Member DNA tests in progress at FTDNA

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 10/10/2015

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    11/11/2015, 635, 389248, Y-DNA 37

    11/25/2015, 639, 438740, Y-DNA 37

    12/02/2015, 641, 433559, Y-DNA 37

    12/09/2015, 642, 402256, Y-DNA 67

    12/23/2015, 643, 420316, Y-DNA 37

     

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is another direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

  • Skeletons found in Edinburgh car park could be noble family from the Dark Ages

    Using forensic, isotopic and DNA techniques, scientists found the burials belonged to more than one generation of a single family, with two of the bodies thought to be warriors due to their multiple healed wounds.  Click here to read the entire story in the Independent.

  • Archaeologists say they have found the bones of Mona Lisa but cannot extract DNA

    A team of researchers have been working since 2011 to determine through genealogy, carbon dating and genetics, if the model of Mona Lisa was Lisa Gherardini, known today as ‘La Gioconda’, a silk merchant’s wife in Florence who lived across the street from da Vinci in the early 1500s. It is believed her husband commissioned da Vinci to paint her portrait in 1503.  Click here to read the entire story in Ancient Origins.

  • Free weekend of access to FindMyPast

    FindMyPast has announced that its entire collection of records from Ireland, UK, USA, and Australia/New Zealand will be opened up to all comers for free this weekend, September 18-21.  Click here to read more and start searching.

  • Researchers unravel the mysteries of the Basque People

    With their distinct genetic make-up and ancient language, the origin of people from the Basque Country in northern Spain and southern France has long been an enigma. Previously thought to be a population of unmixed hunter-gatherers that survived the influx of farmers from the Middle East around 6,000 years ago, new genetic evidence suggests that things aren’t quite so clear-cut.  Click here to read the whole story in IFL Science!

  • Genetic Genealogy Ireland: The "first look" DNA Lecture Schedule

    Thinking about attending Genetic Genealogy Ireland 2015 in Dublin?  Click here to read more about it and make your plans for October 9-11.

  • Muddied Racial Histories of American Presidents

    DNA giveth, and DNA taketh away.  Warren G. Harding was charged during his 1920 Presidential campaign with having an African-American ancestor.   The same genetic test that recently proved he was the father of an illegitimate daughter also proved he had no ancestors from sub-Saharan Africa.  Read more at this link

  • Member DNA tests in progress at FTDNA

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 08/21/2015

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    09/09/2015, 634, 86314, Family Finder and Backbone SNP Pack

    09/09/2015, 634, 376378, Family Finder

    09/16/2015, 631, 405908, Family Finder

    09/16/2015, 626, 414718, Y-DNA 37

    09/16/2015, 625, 420316, Y-DNA 12

    09/23/2015, 636, 407964, Family Finder and Backbone SNP Pack

    09/23/2015, 619, 257305, Y-DNA 37

    09/30/2015, 634, 130263, PF4837

    10/07/2015, 633, 195627, mtDNA Plus

    10/07/2015, 631, 241057, Y-DNA 67

    10/21/2015, 633, 389237, Y-DNA 37

    11/11/2015, 635, 206342, Y-DNA 111

    11/11/2015, 635, 389248, Y-DNA 37

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is another direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

  • Harding's Love Child Confirmed Through DNA Testing

    After nearly 100 years of rumors and historical speculation, DNA testing has confirmed that President Warren Harding had a child out of wedlock - his only biological child - with mistress Nan Britton.  Click here to read the entire story in ABC News.

  • First Peoples

    In case you missed it, the episode of First Peoples on PBS that included work done at Family Tree DNA is now viewable online at this link.

  • Remains of English Jamestown colony leaders discovered

    There is still more research to be done.  Genetic analysis may even help trace living descendants of the men.  Click here to read more at BBC.com.

  • First Migrants to Americas a Complex Mix

    The first people to set foot in the Americas apparently came from Siberia during the last ice age.

    That's the conventional wisdom.

    But now there's evidence from two different studies published this week that the first Americans may have migrated from different places at different times — and earlier than people thought.

    Click here to read the whole story in Health News.

  • WDYTYA American style is back

    The new season premieres July 26th at 9/8c.  Watch a clip at this link.

  • Tests in progress at Family Tree DNA

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 07/04/2015

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    01/15/2015, 597, 361064, Backbone

    04/22/2015, 611, 376378, Backbone

    07/22/2015, 627, 408490, Family Finder

    07/22/2015, 627, 130263, Family Finder

    07/29/2015, 628, 347740, Family Finder

    07/29/2015, 620, 389206, Y-DNA 37

    08/05/2015, 626, B10256, mtFull Sequence

    08/12/2015, 625, 130263, Big Y

    08/12/2015, 622, 389212, Y-DNA 37

    08/12/2015, 622, B53939, Y-DNA 111

    08/19/2015, 626, 414718, mtFull Sequence and Y-DNA 37

    08/19/2015, 625, 420316, Y-DNA 12

    08/26/2015, 627, 130263, Y-DNA 111

    08/26/2015, 627, 201688, Big Y

    08/26/2015, 629, 389225, Y-DNA 37

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is another direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

  • So you're related to Charlemagne?

    But we are all special, which means none of us are. If you’re vaguely of European extraction, you are also the fruits of Charlemagne’s prodigious loins. A fecund ruler, he sired at least 18 children by motley wives and concubines, including Charles the Younger, Pippin the Hunchback, Drogo of Metz, Hruodrud, Ruodhaid, and not forgetting Hugh.  Click here to read more in The Guardian.

  • Kennewick Man's origins revealed by genetic study

    Advances in DNA sequencing technology have given us important new tools for studying the great human diasporas and the history of indigenous populations. Now we are seeing its adoption in new areas, including forensics and archeology. The case of Kennewick Man is particularly interesting given the debates surrounding the origins of Native American populations.  Click here to read more at Stanford Medicine.

  • Out of Africa via Egypt

    New DNA research suggests that European and Asian (Eurasian) peoples originated when early Africans moved north - through the region that is now Egypt - to expand into the rest of the world. The findings, published in the American Journal of Human Genetics, answer a long-standing question as to whether early humans emerged from Africa by a route via Egypt, or via Ethiopia.  Click here to read the entire story in Archaeology News Report and thanks to member Doyle Phillips for the tip.

  • Interview of FTDNA founder Bennett Greenspan

    Russ Capper interviews Bennett Greenspan about founding and running "Family Tree DNA", the first company in the world established to commercially test DNA to determine your Genealogy. The MIT Enterprise Forum of Texas/BioHouston program was held at the BioScience Research Collaborative in Houston Texas on April 28, 2015.  Click here to listen to the interview.

  • DNA lab to help ID Pearl Harbor remains

    A gram of bone. If well-preserved and accompanied by the right genetic reference samples, it's enough to put a name and a face on an unknown soul thought lost to the ages.

    In the coming months and years, experts in Dover and Hawaii will analyze nearly 400 such fragments, and the remains from which they're taken, as they launch a project with particular resonance this Memorial Day: identifying the sailors and Marines killed on Dec. 7, 1941, when Japanese attackers sank the USS Oklahoma. For the past 65 years, those remains have been buried as unknowns in graves at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu.

    Click here to continue reading this article at Delaware Online.

  • SMGF DNA Database has been shut down

    The Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation (SMGF) was an early collector of DNA information to be used for genealogy purposes. It was founded by inventor and philanthropist James LeVoy Sorenson and Brigham Young University professor Dr. Scott Woodward. Mr. Sorenson envisioned the development of a genetic-genealogical blueprint of all humankind. Some years later, the database and supporting infrastructure was acquired by Ancestry.com and became the basis for what is now Ancestry DNA. It has since served the interests of thousands of genealogists as well as several other communities.  Sadly, Ancestry has now announced the closure of this valuable service.  Click here to read more in Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter.

  • Member tests in progress at FTDNA

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 05/15/2015

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    01/15/2015, 597, 361064, Backbone

    04/22/2015, 611, 376378, Backbone

    05/27/2015, 610, 348812, Y-DNA 67

    05/27/2015, 607, 9955, Y-DNA 111

    05/27/2015, 605, 393670, mtFull Sequence

    06/03/2015, 612, 156888, Y-DNA 111

    06/03/2015, 612, 397264, Y-DNA 37

    06/03/2015, 619, 412290, Y-DNA 37

    06/17/2015, 619, 231809, CTS11451

    06/24/2015, 620, 151873, Z306 and Z307

    06/24/2015, 615, 195017, Y-DNA 67 and mtFull Sequence

    06/24/2015, 620, 369115, Y-DNA 37

    06/24/2015, 620, 389206, Y-DNA 37

    07/01/2015, 621, 369346, U152 and DF99

    07/01/2015, 617, 408490, mtFull Sequence

    07/01/2015, 617, 408565, Y-DNA 67

    07/01/2015, 616, 408912, Y-DNA 25

    07/01/2015, 616, N9106, Y-DNA 37

    07/08/2015, 618, N139941, Y-DNA67

    07/08/2015, 620, 226507, Big Y

    07/08/2015, 622, 389212, Y-DNA 37

    07/08/2015, 622, B53939, Y-DNA 111

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is another direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

  • Admixture: not soup yet

    "We have to keep in mind what these admixture [ethnicity] tests do: they take the DNA of living people - us, the test takers - and they compare it to the DNA of other living people - people whose parents and grandparents and, sometimes, even great grandparents all come from one geographic area.  Then they try to extrapolate backwards into time."  

    Click here to read the entire blog in The Legal Genealogist written by Judy Russell.

  • Ancient DNA tells a new Human Story


    Armed with old bones and new DNA sequencing technology, scientists are getting a much better understanding of the prehistory of the human species.  Click here to read the whole story in the Wall Street Journal.

  • Which DNA test is best for you?

    Here is a link to a lecture delivered by Maurice Gleeson at the recent WDYTYA - Live 2015 conference held last week in Birmingham, England.

  • Common errors in "Proving" an ancestor using autosomal DNA

    Although this Phillips DNA Project is a Y-DNA project, many of the members of this project have also gotten their autosomal DNA tested.  Here is a link to a blog that explains why it is so difficult to use autosomal DNA to prove a common ancestor.

  • The Genographic Project Turns Ten

    Ten years ago, a group of international scientists and indigenous community members gathered at National Geographic Society's headquarters in Washington, D.C. to kick off the Genographic Project.  The plan: to use DNA analyses to answer fundamental scientific questions, such as where we originated from, and how we came to populate the earth.  Click here to read the whole story at National Geographic.

  • Your Family: Past, Present, and Future

    "I don’t know you, but I can almost guarantee that you don’t ask your grandparents (or older parents) enough questions about their lives and the lives of their parents. We’re all incredibly self-absorbed, and in being so, we forget to care about the contextof the lives we’re so immersed in. We can use google to learn anything we want about world history and our country’s history, but our own personal history—which we really shouldknow quite well—can only be accessed by asking questions."

    Click here to continue reading this clever, interesting post at Wait But Why about family history and genealogy.

  • Member tests in progress at FTDNA

    DNA Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 03/31/2015

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    04/01/2015, 604, 311661, Y-DNA 111

    04/08/2015, 603, 112572, FGS and Y-DNA 111

    04/08/2015, 605, 29533, Mt-DNA Plus

    04/15/2015, 613, 361064, Backbone and Family Finder

    04/15/2015, 610, 202983, S9294, Z251

    04/22/2015, 611, 376378, Backbone

    04/22/2015, 614, 205815, Family Finder

    04/22/2015, 614, N63710, Family Finder

    04/29/2015, 615, 237386, Family Finder

    05/06/2015, 607, 9955, Y-DNA 111

    05/06/2015, 613, 403085, Y-DNA 111

    05/13/2015, 610, 369346, Y-DNA 67

    05/13/2015, 614, 109492, BY477

    05/13/2015, 608, 397479, Y-DNA 37

    05/20/2015, 609, 336546, Y-DNA 37

    05/20/2015, 615, 181584, Y-DNA 111

    05/20/2015, 615, 195017, Y-DNA 67

    05/20/2015, 609, 390488, Y-DNA 37

    05/20/2015, 615, 407362, Y-DNA 37

    05/27/2015, 610, 151873, Y-DNA 111

    05/27/2015, 610, 348812, Y-DNA 67

    05/27/2015, 610, 384377, Y-DNA 37

    06/03/2015, 612, 156888, Y-DNA 111

    06/03/2015, 612, 397264, Y-DNA 37

    06/03/2015, 612, 400311, Y-DNA 37

    06/03/2015, 612, 403373, Y-DNA 12 and Family Finder

    06/03/2015, 615, N62146, Big Y

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is another direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

  • King Richard III: Battle of Bosworth descendants to meet

    Descendants of some 20 families who fought at the Battle of Bosworth, that ended the reign of Richard III, are to meet for the first time.

    Researchers who identified the king using DNA from his distant family used the same techniques to find descendants of those who fought in the battle.

    They will meet family members directly related to the last Plantagenet king at a reception in Leicester later.

    Some have flown from Australia, South Africa and Canada for the occasion.

    Richard, the last English king to die in battle, was killed at Bosworth Field in 1485, at the end of the Wars of the Roses.

    Click here to read more in BBC News and thanks to my Cousin John in Birmingham for sending me this link.

  • DNA study shows Celts are not a unique genetic group

    A DNA study of Britons has shown that genetically there is not a unique Celtic group of people in the UK.

    According to the data, those of Celtic ancestry in Scotland and Cornwall are more similar to the English than they are to other Celtic groups.

    The study also describes distinct genetic differences across the UK, which reflect regional identities.

    And it shows that the invading Anglo Saxons did not wipe out the Britons of 1,500 years ago, but mixed with them.

    Click here to read the entire article in BBC News.

  • FTDNA's new "skin"

    Recently Family Tree DNA launched a new "skin" that they are calling MyGroups.  

    Here are some of the features you will see with this upgrade:

     

    • New privacy choices given to both group members and to group administrators. These choices allow a group to be completely visible to the public, or to only allow it to be visible to members of that project who are logged in to their accounts. Individuals can also control who sees their information by choosing settings in myFTDNA’s Privacy and Sharing page.

     

    • Activity Feed - People can share their research, assist each other, publish findings, documents and photos.

     

    • The new Coupon feature - a contribution from Family Tree DNA to bring in new members or to encourage test upgrades. These single-use coupons are now automated, and will be generated at 10 am Central Time daily.

     

    • Ease of discovery - converted Family Finder projects are now searchable, making it easier for those projects to be found by potential members.


    If you have not logged onto your personal page recently, why don't you do so and let us know how you like this new "skin".

  • Here's where "white" Americans have the highest percentage of African ancestry

    Many Americans who call themselves white might be surprised to find out that they have some African ancestry.  Especially in the South.  Click here to read the entire story at Vox.

  • Findmypast begins offering DNA tests

    On February 12th, Findmypast announced its new partnership with Family Tree DNA.  This new partnership is just the beginning of Findmypast's journey into DNA testing for their customers.  Findmypast will also be offering a special rate on FTDNA tests as part of their premium service for annual subscribers.  Click here to read more in Dick Eastman's newsletter.

  • Doctor, Have You Had Your DNA Tested?

    Twelve years ago, for the first time, scientists sequenced a person’s genome. The cost was about $1 billion. Since then, the price has plummeted, and is now around $5,000. Soon, it will be less than $1,000, making this question ever more common. Whole genome sequencing is giving us millions of times more genetic information about ourselves than did prior tests; and many patients are getting sequenced. Click here to read the entire story in the NY Times.

  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 2/04/2015

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    01/15/2015, 597, 361064, Backbone

    02/11/2015, 594, 369346, Mt-DNA Plus

    02/11/2015, 598, 374276, Y-DNA 37

    02/11/2015, 599, 374339, Y-DNA 37

    02/12/2015, 601, 109492, Y-DNA 67

    02/12/2015, 603, 112572, FGS and Y-DNA 111

    02/12/2015, 601, 246259, Y-DNA 67

    02/12/2015, 601, 353516, Y-DNA 67

    02/12/2015, 601, 380798, Y-DNA 37

    02/12/2015, 601, 381707, Y-DNA 37

    02/18/2015, 607, 31356, Family Finder

    02/18/2015, 605, 374489, Family Finder

    02/19/2015, 602, 109920, Big Y

    02/19/2015, 602, 383772, Y-DNA 37

    02/19/2015, 604, 311661, Y-DNA 111

    02/25/2015, 605, 29533, Mt-DNA Plus

    02/25/2015, 600, 376378, Y-DNA 37

    03/11/2015, 607, 9955, Y-DNA 111

    03/11/2015, 607, 151873, Z156, Z16 and Z381

     

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is another direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

  • Human and Neanderthal love affair is traced back to Israel, 55,000 years ago

    The first interbreeding between humans and Neanderthals may have taken place in what is now Israel. Scientists report the discovery of a 55,000-year-old modern human skull in a cave in western Galilee. Named "Manot," the skull represents the first human remains pinpointed to that time and location -- when Neanderthals are known to have been present.  Click here to read the whole story in the Washington Post.  Click here to see a map of the known range of Neanderthals plus some comparisons with humans and thanks to member Doyle Phillips for these links.

  • Realizing the Illusion: Communicating with Long Lost Relatives

    George Bernard Shaw once opined that “the single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place.” Nothing could be more true, as genetic genealogists know all too well.

    In this brave new world, we must employ every technological advantage to network with DNA matches and uncover the details of our shared ancestry. Leave no stone unturned.

    Click here to read the entire article by Shannon Christmas.

  • Definition of generation length

    Genetic genealogists seek guidance on which generation length is the most appropriate to use with TMRCA (Time to Most Recent Common Ancestor) tables when they want to multiply the number of elapsed generations by some average generation length to derive the elapsed time.  Click here to read more in the ISOGG wiki.

  • Ancestry Y-DNA and mtDNA samples have not been destroyed

    Ancestry.com announced back in June of 2014 that they would be retiring their Y-DNA and mtDNA tests and that the company would be destroying the Y-DNA and mtDNA samples that they had in storage.  Apparently the company has changed its mind.  Click here to read more in a blog written by Debbie Kennett.

  • Who Owns What in the Genealogy World?

    The world of genealogy has seen a tremendous number of company buy-outs and partnerships over the past few years.  A woman named Alona Tester did some research and published her findings at this link.

  • DNA reveals Vikings brought their women when raiding the British Isles

    A DNA study has shed light on the importance of Viking women in the colonization of the British Isles in the Middle Ages, suggesting that Viking men were family-orientated and not as blood-thirsty as previously thought.  Click here to read more in the Daily Mail.

  • Member tests in progress at FTDNA

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 12/24/2014

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    12/11/2014, 594, 336507, Y-DNA 37

    12/11/2014, 594, 369346, Mt-DNA Plus and Y-DNA 37

    12/18/2014, 595, 345273, Y-DNA 37

    12/25/2014, 596, 373605, Y-DNA 37

    12/25/2015, 596, N62146, L1402

    01/01/2015, 600, 112572, Family Finder

    01/01/2015, 597, 361064, Backbone

    01/07/2015, 593, 368674, Y-DNA 37

    01/07/2015, 593, 369497, Y-DNA 37

    01/08/2015, 598, 374276, Y-DNA 37

    01/15/2015, 599, 374339, Y-DNA 37

    01/22/2015, 600, 376378, Y-DNA 37

    01/29/2015, 601, 109492, Y-DNA 67

    01/29,2015, 601, 246259, Y-DNA 67

    01/29/2015, 601, 353516, Y-DNA 67

    01/29/2015, 601, 380798, Y-DNA 37

    01/29/2015, 601, 381707, Y-DNA 37

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is another direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

  • Talk to your Family this Holiday Season

    Many of us will be enjoying dinners and other festive occasions this week with our relatives. I would suggest this is a great time to compare notes with the relatives. Indeed, older members of the family may know a few tidbits of genealogy information that you have not yet found. However, there is another, more serious, reason for comparing notes with relatives: family health hazards.  Click here to read more in Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter.

  • 18th century Pennsylvania German naming customs & patterns

    Here is a link to an article written by Charles Kerchner on German naming customs.  This article should be of interest to individuals researching 18th century Pennsylvania-Dutch or German names and records.  Thanks to member Doyle Phillips for bringing this article to our attention.

  • Richard III's DNA throws up infidelity surprise

    Scientists who studied genetic material from Richard III's remains found in a Leicester car park say their findings might have profound historical implications.

    Their analysis shows that DNA passed down on the maternal side matches that of living relatives, but genetic information passed down on the male side does not.

    Depending on where in the family tree the break occurred, it could cast doubt on the Tudor claim to the English throne or, indeed, on Richard's.

    Click here to read more in BBC News.

  • FTDNA's 2014 Holiday Sale

    Y37 $169 $129 ($40 off) Buy Now
    Y67 $268 $199 ($69 off) Buy Now
    Y111 $359 $289 ($70 off) Buy Now

    Upgrades
    Y12 to Y37 $99 $78 ($21 off) Buy Now
    Y12 to Y67 $189 $149 ($40 off) Buy Now
    Y12 to Y111 $339 $257 ($82 off) Buy Now
      Y25 to Y37 $49 $39 ($10 off) Buy Now
      Y25 to Y67 $148 $119 ($29 off) Buy Now
      Y25 to Y111 $249 $209 ($40 off) Buy Now
      Y37 to Y67 $99 $78 ($21 off) Buy Now
      Y37 to Y111 $220 $187 ($33 off) Buy Now
      Y67 to Y111 $129 $109 ($20 off) Buy Now
    Family Finder $99 $89 ($10 off) Buy Now
    mtFullSequence $199 $169 ($30 off) Buy Now
    mtDNA+ to mtFullSequence $159 $139 ($20 off) Buy Now
  • When DNA confirms the Paper Trail

    Here is a link to an article written by CeCe Moore who is a consultant on the TV series Finding Your Roots. 

  • Irish Naming Patterns

    Names are very useful in tracking down lineages when little or no paper trail exists.  Here is a link to an article that explains how the Irish named their children.  I have found this same naming pattern to be used by everyone in the British Isles, not just the Irish.  Thanks to member Doyle Phillips for this tip.

  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 11/12/2014

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    12/04/2014, 593, 368674, Y-DNA 37

    12/04/2014, 593, 369497, Y-DNA 37

    12/11/2014, 594, 336507, Y-DNA 37

    12/11/2014, 594, 369346, Y-DNA 37

    12/18/2014, 595, 345273, Y-DNA 37

    12/25/2014, 596, 373605, Y-DNA 37

      

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is another direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

  • Tracing Descent from a Slave Owner with DNA

    Although one of the most exciting aspects of genetic genealogy is discovering new avenues to investigate, confirming a paper trail through DNA is a powerful tool as well and can be equally as satisfying. No matter how thorough we are with our traditional genealogy research, sometimes the records are pointing in the wrong direction. At times DNA can reveal these unexpected discrepancies, while other times the exhaustive paper trail research is thankfully confirmed through genetic genealogy.  Click here to read an article written by CeCe Moore about Valerie Jarrett's enslaved ancestor Henry Taylor.

  • DNA yields secrets of human pioneer

    DNA analysis of a 45,000-year-old human has helped scientists pinpoint when our ancestors interbred with Neanderthals.  Click here to read the story in BBC News and thanks to my cousin John Phillips for this tip.

  • Scientists say DNA proof of Jack the Ripper's identity is fatally flawed

    Last month Russell Edwards, the author of a new book entitled Naming Jack the Ripper, said he had irrefutable evidence that the notorious serial killer who terrorized London in the late 1880's was a Polish emigrant named Aaron Kosminski.  However, Edwards' claim has been called into question by a scathing follow-up report published by The Independent.  Click here to read the story in the Huffington Post.

  • The hapless haplogroup

    Here is a link to a blog called the Legal Genealogist written by Judy G. Russell that explains why haplogroup predictions acquired from autosomal DNA testing are not as accurate as haplogroup predictions obtained through Y-DNA and mtDNA tests. 

  • Finding Fathers: Decoding the Y-Chromosome

    Cece Moore is a genetic genealogist who is serving as a consultant on the PBS TV show "Finding Your Roots".  Here is a link to an article she wrote reflecting on her experience behind the scenes of Episode One which was titled In Search of Our Fathers.

  • Tests in progress at FTDNA

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 10/07/2014

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    08/07/2014, 575, 233001, Family Finder

    10/16/2014, 586, 197659, Y-DNA 67 markers

    10/16/2014, 586, 231510, Y-DNA 67 markers

    10/16/2014, 586, 275787, Y-DNA 111 markers

    10/16/2014, 586, 353516, Y-DNA 37 markers

    10/23/2014, 590, 221647, Family Finder

    10/30/2014, 588, 248598, Y-DNA 67 markers

    10/30/2014, 588, 361064, Y-DNA 37

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is another direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

  • deCODEme service is being discontinued

    This is to notify that the deCODEme service from deCODE genetics is being discontinued.

    For this reason, all deCODEme customer accounts will be permanently closed on January 01, 2015. However, user accounts will be accessible through December 31, 2014. 

    For logging in you will need to enter your username and password on the deCODEme login page; http://www.decodeme.com.  In case of a forgotten password, you can select the “Forgot my password” option on the login page, but for a forgotten username you will need to send an email to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. 

    We encourage customers to save and/or print their results as needed.

  • Europeans drawn from three ancient 'tribes'

    The modern European gene pool was formed when three ancient populations mixed within the last 7,000 years.

    Blue-eyed, swarthy hunters mingled with brown-eyed, pale skinned farmers as the latter swept into Europe from the Near East.

    But another, mysterious population with Siberian affinities also contributed to the genetic landscape of the continent.

    The findings are based on analysis of genomes from nine ancient Europeans.  

    Click here to read the entire story in BBC News and thanks to John Phillips and Doyle Phillips for the tip.

  • DNA ties Ashkenazi Jews to group of just 330 people from Middle Ages

    Ashkenazi Jews are descended from a small group of people who lived 600 to 800 hundred years ago, according to their DNA.  Click here to read the whole story in the Los Angeles Times Science Now.

  • Jack the Ripper identified through mtDNA

    DNA evidence on a shawl found at Ripper murder scene nails the killer 126 years after the crime was committed.  By testing descendants of the victim and suspect, identifications were made.  Click here to read the entire story in the Daily Mail Online.

  • Announcing the FTDNA End of Summer Sale!


    Family Tree DNA is holding an End of Summer Sale on all Y-DNA tests.  Order now because the sale ends 9/3/2014.  Here is a link to a page where you can order a test through our Phillips DNA Project:

    https://www.familytreedna.com/group-join.aspx?Group=Phillips

    Here are the sale prices:

     

    Standard TestsRegular PriceSale Price
    Y-37 $169 $129
    Y-67 $268 $199
    Y-111 $367 $279
    Big Y $595 $495


     

    UpgradesRegular PriceSale Price
    Y-12 -> Y-37 $99 $70
    Y-12 -> Y-67 $189 $148
    Y-12 -> Y-111 $339 $239
    Y-25 -> Y-37 $49 $35
    Y-25 -> Y-67 $148 $114
    Y-25 -> Y-111 $249 $209
    Y-37 -> Y-67 $99 $79
    Y-37 -> Y-111 $220 $179
    Y-67 -> Y-111 $129
  • Faces of Medieval Scots Digitally Reconstructed

    The skeletons of almost 400 Scottish men, women and children who lived between the 15th and 18th century, whose remains were unearthed in a cemetery five years ago, have been brought  back to life thanks to digital faces created by forensic artists.  Click here to see the pictures and read the article in the Daily Mail.

  • DNA tests in progress at Family Tree DNA

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 08/12/2014

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    05/22/2014, 544, 191679, Big Y

    08/07/2014, 575, 233001, Family Finder

    08/14/2014, 575, 275787, Big Y

    08/14/2014, 575, 76446, Big Y

    09/11/2014, 581, 65267, S7753

    09/11/2014, 581, 347654, Y-DNA 111 markers

    09/11/2014, 581, Y-DNA 37 markers

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is another direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

  • The History of Surnames

    Here is a link to an excellent video on You Tube about the history of surnames which should be of interest to all genealogies. 

  • The Master Genealogist to be discontinued

    Bob Velke, the owner of Wholly Genes, Inc. announced that he has decided to discontinue a genealogy software program called The Master Genealogist used by thousands of genealogists.  Here is a link to an article about this in Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter.

  • France to honor 93-year-old Henry Phillips

    Henry Phillips, a 93-year-old World War II veteran from Wilmington, NC, became a part of a French tradition on July 11th when he received France's Legion of Honor in recognition of his contribution to the liberation of France from the Nazis in 1944.  Click here to read the entire story in Star News Online.

  • Phillips Involved in Indian Uprising

    Here is a link to an interesting story about a Phillips man involved in an Indian uprising that occurred in South Dakota in 1890.  This story appeared in the Memphis Daily Appeal on 29 November 1890.  Our thanks to member Wayne Phillips for sending us this link.

  • DNA Ancestry for All


    Big ad campaigns and celebrity involvement have helped increase public interest in genetic genealogy, but helping consumers understand their DNA ancestry testing results remains difficult.  Click here to read more in The Scientist.

  • DNA tests in progress at Family Tree DNA


    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 07/02/2014

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    05/22/2014, 544, 191679, Big Y

    05/22/2014, 553, 324238, Backbone

    05/29/2014, 565, 326722, Backbone

    05/29/2014, 565, 327537, Backbone

    06/05/2014, 566, 327862, Backbone

    06/19/2014, 568, N116909, PF4837

    07/12/2014, 570, 337278, MT-DNA Full Sequence

    07/17/2014, 572, 122807, Y-DNA 111

    07/17/2014, 572, N123569, Y-DNA 37

    07/31/2014, 574, 157462, Big Y

    07/31/2014, 576, 351812, Y-DNA 12

    08/07/2014, 575, 233001, Family Finder

    08/07/2014, 575, 76446, Big Y

    08/07/2014, 575, 275787, Big Y

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    Big Y Test:  This is another direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

  • WDYTYA? Live 2015 moves to Birmingham

     

    There is now official confirmation in the form of a press release from Immediate Media that Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2015 will be held at the National Exhibition Centre in Birmingham, England from April 16 to April 18.  Click here to read more in Cruwys News.

  • Welsh Phillips family is Britain's model family


    A Phillips family from Cardiff, Wales, models for Disney, Mercedes and Cadbury.  Children aged one to fifteen star in adverts with their parents.  Mr. Phillips says his wholesome family is a Welsh version of the Waltons.  Click here to read more in the UK's Daily Mail.

  • Petitioning Ancestry.com


    A man from Lakeland, Florida, has started an online petition requesting Ancestry.com to reconsider and find an alternative to the planned destruction of Y-DNA and mtDNA samples in their database.  Here is what he says in the petition:


    A number of the samples that you are planning to destroy were collected from or submitted by people who were the last person in their family's line and who are now no longer living.  By doing so, you will be destroying samples that can never be collected again, and that may someday open a world of genealogical data to family history researchers.  We believe that some other private or public organization can be found that would be willing to preserve these samples for future use. 


    Click here if you want to sign his petition.

  • Ancestry.com is dropping Y-DNA tests

    Ancestry.com announced yesterday that they are discontinuing their Y-DNA and mtDNA tests and all the stored Y-DNA and mtDNA samples will be destroyed on the 5th of September.  If you were tested at Ancestry.com, you should download your test results immediately.  I also recommend transferring your results to Family Tree DNA.  Click here to read more in a blog written by Debbie Kennett.

  • DNA tests in progress at Family Tree DNA in Phillips Project

    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 06/03/2014

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

    03/28/2014, 544, 191679, Big Y

    05/22/2014, 553, 324238, Y-DNA 67

    05/22/2014, 563, 85045, Mt-DNA Full Sequence

    05/29/2014, 565, 326722, Backbone

    05/29/2014, 565, 327537, Y-DNA 67

    06/05/2014, 566, 327862, Backbone

    06/19/2014, 568, N116909, PF4837

    07/03/2014, 570, 343720, Y-DNA 37

    07/03/2014, 572, 347654, Y-DNA 37

    07/12/2014, 570, 337278, MT-DNA Full Sequence

    07/17/2014, 572, 122807, Y-DNA 111

    07/17/2014, 572, 342741, Y-DNA 37

    07/17/2014, 572, N123569, Y-DNA 37

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

    Big Y Test:  This is another direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

    Family Finder Test: This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,  and R.

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

  • Our Website's New Look

    By now you have realized our website has a new look.  The color scheme hasn't changed much, but pages are a little more spaced out, the font is slightly larger, and hopefully you will find it easier to read.  Our site turned 5 years old back in the early spring so we decided to freshen it up.  Yes, it is a little more modern looking with a good reason.  

    Our website is now using web responsive technology.  What's that you ask!  Simply, our site will look good and be easy to read on desktops, laptops, tablets, and yes, even mobile phones!  Whatever device you view your internet content with, you'll love browsing our site with it.

    A few other things you should know about:

    • We are working to improve our newsletter archives so they have a table of contents built in.  Two years down, four to go!
    • We've integrated DNA and genealogy news feeds from other popular sites.  You can drop by and check them all in one place.  You can even vote them up or down and leave a comment if you're logged into your account.  If you can think of any others just let us know.
    • Our forum is still open and ready for posting but now you can social share topics!  Find a great thread with great information, let everyone know about it.
    • Thanks for stopping by, now let us know what you think on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ or whatever social media sharing service you enjoy using.  Just use the hashtag #phillipsdna in your posts as you spread the word.
  • America's Sources of Immigrants through the years

     

    With more than 40 million immigrants, the United States is the top destination in the world for those moving from one country to another.  You can read the rest of the story and look at some interesting maps in an article by Jens Manuel Krogstad and Michael Keegan in the Pew Research Center by clicking this link.

  • Inside all of us lies a hidden history...

    "The Viking Influence" and "Who are the Welsh?" discussed by BritainsDNA at this link.

  • 13,000-Year-Old Body of Girl Discovered in Mexico


    The girl's skeleton is exceptionally complete because of the environment in which she died.  Her pristine preservation enabled scientists to extract enough DNA to determine her shared genetic code with modern Nation Americans.  Click here to read more in International Business Times.

  • Genographic Project records Global Population Gene Flow


    Researchers at National Geographic are learning what happens genetically when different cultures appeared.  The genetic research has helped to resolve a 100-year-old debate in archaelolgical circles: do cultures diffuse to people, or do people spread cultures?  Click here to read in Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News.

  • Joan Phillips, highwaywoman of Nottingham


    Joan Phillips, born 1656 in Northamptonshire, was a Nottingham highway robber who passed herself off as a man.  The Annals of Nottingham distinguished her history as "extraordinary" amidst many "remarkable incidents" of local criminality.  Click here to read more about her in the Nottingham Post.

  • DNA tests in progress at Family Tree DNA


    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 05/03/2014

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    03/28/2014, 544, 191679, Big Y

    03/28/2014, 542, 93184, Big Y

    05/07/2014, 553, 324238, Y-DNA 67

    05/17/2014, 563, 335381, Y-DNA 37

    05/22/2014, 563, 85045, Mt-DNA Full Sequence

    05/22/2014, 563, 208372, Mt-DNA Full Sequence

    05/29/2014, 565, 55992, Mt-DNA Full Sequence

    05/29/2014, 565, 326722, Backbone

    05/29/2014, 565, 327537, Y-DNA 67

    05/31/2014, 563, 327537, Y-DNA 67

    05/31/2014, 563, 337445, Y-DNA 37

    06/05/2014, 566, 219553, Mt-DNA Full Sequence

    06/05/2014, 566, 327862, Backbone

    06/07/2014, 565, 322815, Y-DNA 37

    06/19/2014, 568, 53092, DF23

    06/19/2014, 568, N226909, PF4837


    EXPLANATION OF TESTS
    :

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

    Big Y Test:  This is another direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,and R.

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

  • The genetic imprint of Niall of the Nine Hostages

    DNA research bolsters the historical record of the Ui Neill clan's long-lasting primacy in medieval Ireland.  Click here to read more in The Irish Times.

  • DNA Day sale at FTDNA on 37 marker Y-DNA test


    In celebration of DNA Day, Family Tree DNA is running a sale on their 37 marker Y-DNA test.  Order now, because this offer is valid only for three days through April 29, 2014.  Click here to order a 37 marker Y-DNA test through our Phillips DNA Project for the sales price of $135.20.

  • Prehistoric humans and Neanderthals were 99.84% genetically alike


    An average Neanderthal and a prehistoric human were about as close, genetically speaking, as any two humans walking the Earth today. That is the conclusion of a new Israeli study that finds only 0.12% of difference,
     on average, separated the Neanderthals’ genomes from those of early homo sapiens.  Click here to read more in Science Recorder.

  • My Weekend with GOONS


    Dick Eastman spoke at the annual conference of the Guild of One-Name Studies held in Ashford, Kent, England last weekend.  Click here to read about it in Eastman's Onnline Genealogy Newsletter.  Dick mentioned that nobody has taken on the common surnames of Smith, Jones or Johnson, but I am proud to say that Phillips is a registered surname with the Guild.

  • DNA tests in progress at Family Tree DNA in Phillips Project


    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 04/08/2014

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     03/28/2014, 543, 56277, Big Y

    03/28/2014, 544, 191679, Big Y

    03/28/2014, 542, 93184, Big Y

    03/28/2014, 545, E13398, Big Y

    04/09/2014, 553, 324238, Y-DNA 67

    04/11/2014, 556, 327862, Prediction

    05/03/2014, 559, 334817, Y-DNA 111

    05/10/2014, 560, 300520, Y-DNA 37

    05/17/2014, 563, 335381, Y-DNA 37

    05/22/2014, 563, 85045, Mt-DNA Full Sequence

    05/22/2014, 563, 208372, Mt-DNA Full Sequence

    05/22/2014, 563, 219553, Mt-DNA Full Sequence

    05/22/2014, 563, 275787, Mt-DNA Full Sequence

    05/31/2014, 563, 327537, Y-DNA 67

    05/31/2014, 563, 337445, Y-DNA 37


    EXPLANATION OF TESTS
    :

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

    Big Y Test:  This is another direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the universal paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science, not personal genealogy.  This is an anthropological test, not a genealogical test.

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O, and R.

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

  • A Genetic Census of America


    Using autosomal DNA results from over a quarter million people, the AncestryDNA science team set out to perform a "genetic census" of the United States.  Click here to read an article about it in the Ancestry.com Blog and look at the maps.

  • Distribution of European Y-chromosome DNA haplogroups by country


    Male Y-chromosome DNA can be divided into genealogical groups sharing a common ancient paternal ancestor.  These are called haplogroups.  Click here to see some interesting charts showing the distribution of Y-chromosome haplogroups in Europe.

  • Archaeologists discover the tomb of Attila the Hun


    Construction workers building the foundations of a new bridge over the Danube River in the Hungarian capitol, Budapest, have unearthed a spectacular 5th century sepulchre. The analysis of the monument revealed that it was the burial chamber of a great hunnic leader, most likely  that of King Attila himself. - See more in World News Daily at this link.

  • Have AncestryDNA discontinued their Y-STR and mtDNA tests?


    It appears that AncestryDNA has stopped selling their Y-STR
     and mtDNA tests. The website now shows that the tests are out of stock and visitors are directed to the landing page for the new AncestryDNA autosomal DNA test.  Click here to read more in a blog written by genetic genealogist Debbie Kennett.

  • What medieval Europe did with its teenagers


    Today, there's often a perception that Asian children are given a hard time by their parents. But a few hundred years ago northern Europe took a particularly harsh line, sending children away to live and work in someone else's home. Not surprisingly, the children didn't always like it.  Click here to read the entire story in BBC News Magazine and our thanks to British member John Phillips for sending us this link.

  • Houston Chronicle article features FTDNA founders


    The Sunday, March 16th, 2014, issue of the Houston Chronicle features an article about Houston's own entrpreneurs, Max Blankfeld and Bennett Greenspan, who founded Family Tree DNA.  Click here to read more in a blog written by Roberta Estes.

  • Member tests in progress at Family Tree DNA


    Member Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 03/17/2014

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

    03/15/2014, 553, 327537, Y-DNA 37

    03/27/2014, 555, 311661, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    03/28/2014, 543, 56277, Big Y

    03/28/2014, 544, 191679, Big Y

    03/28/2014, 542, 93184, Big Y

    03/28/2014, 545, E13398, Big Y

    04/02/2014, 556, 89726, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    04/02/2014, 552, 326722, Y-DNA 37

    04/10/2014, 557, 26404, Family Finder

    04/11/2014, 556, 327862, Y-DNA 37

    05/01/2014, 560, 111792, Y-DNA 37

    05/03/2014, 559, 334817, Y-DNA 111

    05/10/2014, 560, 300520, Y-DNA 37


    EXPLANATION OF TESTS
    :

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

    Big Y Test:  This is another direct paternal lineage Y chromosome test designed to explore ancient, deep ancestral links on the paternal tree.  It is intended for expert users with an interest in advancing science.  This is an anthropological test rather than a genealogical test.

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,and R.

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

  • Ancestry.com adds three million Irish records

     

    PROVO, UT -- 03/13/14 -- Ancestry.com announced today the addition of over three million historical records that will help people of Irish descent explore their connections to the Emerald Isle. These include more than 25,000 birth, marriage and death records as well as 2.7 million new records that form the 1855 and 1865 Massachusetts state censuses. Made possible through a relationship with the New England Historic Genealogical Society, the new records will provide further insight for Irish Americans, the nation's third most common ancestral group, and give them the resources to discover more about their family history.  Click here to read more in Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter.

  • British Descendants from Norse Warriors


    According to a genetic study carried out by a new company named BritainsDNA, almost one million Britons alive today are of Viking descent, which means one in 33 British men can claim to be direct descendants of the Vikings.  Click here to read more in UK's Daily Mail.

  • Where did my autosomal DNA Come From?


    Here is a link to an article in the Ancestry.com blog that explains the inheritance patterns of autosomal DNA.  Please note that the Phillips DNA Project is based on Y-DNA, which is not the same as autosomal DNA.  Y-DNA is passed down intact from father to son over the generations with very little change.  Autosomal DNA is jumbled up as it is passed down from generation to generation which makes it much more difficult to use for genealogy.

  • How common is your first name?


    Have you ever wondered how common your first name is in the USA?  You can find a state-by-state breakdown of popular first names from 1960 to 2012 at this link.  My first name Nancy was the 17th most popular first name in Missouri in 1960 and now it does not even make the list.  Thanks to Dick Eastman for this fascinating link.

  • March/April issue of newsletter has been posted


    The March/April 2014 issue of the newsletter has been posted under the News tab, where you can read it in PDF, XPS or plain text format.

    This month the newsletter contains answers to FAQ’s received by Family Tree DNA, an article written by member Bob Phillips entitled “Proliferation and Confusion of Israel Phillipses” and a review of a book entitled “Sustainable Genealogy: Separating Fact from Fiction in Family Legends” written by Randy Hite.

    We hope you enjoy the newsletter!  If you would like to submit a story or have any suggestions for the newsletter, please let us know.

     

  • Altai may have been source of earliest Native Americans


    A tiny mountainous region in southern Siberia may have been the genetic source of the earliest Native Americans, according to new research by a University of Pennsylvania-led team of anthropologists.  Click here to read more in Science Daily.

  • Family Tree DNA tests in progress


    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 02/21/2014


    Due Date
    , Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

    02/20/2014, 549, N116909, Z2961

    02/20/2014, 549, 91742, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    02/28/2014, 543, 56277, Big Y

    02/28/2014, 544, 191679, Big Y

    02/28/2014, 542, 93184, Big Y

    02/28/2014, 545, E13398, Big Y

    03/08/2014, 552, 326722, Y-DNA 37

    03/15/2014, 553, 327537, Prediction

    03/27/2014, 555, 311661, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    04/02/2014, 556, 89726, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    04/10/2014, 557, 26404, Family Finder

    04/11/2014, 556, 327862, Y-DNA 37


    EXPLANATION OF TESTS
    :

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,and R.

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

  • Culture-Gene Interactions in Human Origins

    Here is a link to an interesting video posted on YouTube about the interactions of genes and culture.  The video was originally produced for the University of California Television.  Thanks to member Doyle Phillips for this tip!

  • Fallen European empires have left their stamp on the world's gene-pools

    Most human populations are a product of mixture of genetically distinct groups that intermixed within the last 4,000 years.  Click here to read more in the UK's Daily Mail.

  • Genomes of Richard III and his relative to be sequenced


    The genomes of King Richard III and one of his family’s direct living descendants are to be sequenced in a project funded by the Wellcome Trust, the Leverhulme Trust and Professor Sir Alec Jeffreys.  Read about it here in Heritage Daily or here in The Guardian.

  • RootsTech Ancestry.com Blogger Breakfast


    While the FamilySearch dinner was a huge affair, Ancestry.com kept their blogger meeting very intimate.  Click here to read a summary of it in The Ancestry Insider.

  • The Ghost in your Genes - BBC Horizon


    Biology stands on the brink of a shift in the understanding of inheritance. The discovery of epigenetics hidden influences upon the genes could affect every aspect of our lives.  Click here to watch a five-part series on YouTube.

  • Neanderthals gave us disease genes


    Between 2% and 4% of the genetic blueprint of present-day non-Africans came from Neanderthals, it is now believed.  Gene types that influence disease in people today were picked up through interbreeding with Neanderthals, a major study in Nature Journal suggests.  Click here to read more in the science section of BBC News.

  • Tests in progress at Family Tree DNA


    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 01/30/2014

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     02/12/2014, 545, 283893, Refine 12 to 67 markers

    02/20/2014, 546, N116909, Z2961

    02/15/2014, 549, 314225, Y-DNA 12

    02/20/2014, 549, 91742, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    02/28/2014, 543, 56277, Big Y

    02/28/2014, 544, 191679, Big Y

    02/28/2013, 542, 93184, Big Y

    03/08/2014, 552, 326722, Y-DNA 37

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,and R.

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

  • King Alfred the Great's bones possibly discovered


    You wait centuries for the discovery of a royal body … and then two come along at once.  A year after the remains of Richard III turned up under a car park in Leicester, archaeologists have found a piece of a pelvis that could belong to Alfred the Great.  Experts are sure the fragment, excavated from the grounds of Hyde Abbey in Winchester, came from Alfred or his son Edward the Elder.  It has been kept in a box in a storeroom at Winchester City Museum since 1999, but only now have historians realised its importance.


    Dr. Katie Tucker, researcher at the University of Winchester, said that it might be possible to extract DNA from the pelvic bone but said the problem was finding another DNA source to check it with.  
    She explained that it would theoretically be possible to check against a living ancestor, as had been done with Richard III, but the problem was identifying a definite descendant.  Read more in the Daily Mail at this link.

  • DNA proves Titanic survivor was a fraud


    Everyone who survived the 1912 sinking of the Titanic is now dead, and now one of the tragedy's oldest mysteries has been laid to rest: DNA tests confirm that the sensational claim by a woman who said she survived the sinking was all wet.  Click here to read the entire story in Huffington Post.

  • Soaring sales of do-it-yourself DNA test kits in the UK


    Here is a link to a rather sensationalized story in the UK's Daily Mail on do-it-yourself DNA test kits being sold in the UK.

  • DNA marker discovered that possibly indicates Pict heritage


    The Picts were a group of tribes living in the Forth and Clyde beyond the reach of the Romans. They lived near the Britons, Gaels, Angeles and the Vikings. The Romans called them the “Picti” which means “the painted ones.” They were first mentioned by a Roman chronicler in 300 AD. They fought with the Romans and the Angles and the Picts had overrun the northern frontier of the Roman empire on several occasions by the late 200’s. Previously thought to have “disappeared,” scholars now believe they became assimilated.  Click here to read more in Irish Central.

  • Snooki shocked by her diverse ethnicity


    Last Tuesday on "Snooki & JWoww" Nicole Snooki Polizzi got the results of a DNA test to find out her true ethnic heritage.  Click here to watch a video about it.

  • Study dispels theories of Y chromosome's demise


    A comparison of Y chromosomes in eight African and eight European men dispels the common notion that the Y‘s genes are mostly unimportant and that the chromosome is destined to dwindle and disappear.  Click here to read more in UC Berkeley News Center.

  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA


    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 01/06/2014

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     01/08/2014, 536, 308603, Family Finder and Y-DNA 37

    01/15/2014, 544, 275787, Mt-DNA Plus

    01/22/2014, 545, 283893, Refine 12 to 67 markers

    01/30/2014, 546, N116909, Family Finder, Mt-DNA Plus, and Y-DNA 37

    02/14/2014, 547, 199877, Y-DNA 37

    02/15/2014, 549, 314225, Y-DNA 12

    02/20/2014, 549, 91742, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    02/20/2014, 549, Family Finder

    02/08/2014, 546, 318116, Comprehensive Genome

    02/28/2014, 543, 56277, Big Y

    02/28/2014, 546, 259717, Refine 25 to 37 markers

    02/28/2014, 544, 191679, Big Y

    02/28/2013, 542, 93184, Big Y


    EXPLANATION OF TESTS
    :

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,and R.

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

  • DNA and DAR: Launch of New Policy

    President General of the Daughters of the American Revolution, Lynn Young, has written a blog about how the DAR will begin accepting Y-DNA as supportiing evidence for DAR applications in 2014.  Click here to read her blog.

  • 2013's Dynamic Dozen - Top Genetic Genealogy Happenings


    Here is a link to a blog written by Roberta Estes about what she considers to be the major changes in the genetic genealogy industry over the past year.

  • Mystery early human revealed by DNA

     

    DNA analysis of early human remains from a Siberian cave has revealed the esitence of a mysterious human species. Click here to read more in BBC News.

  • Founding meeting of Scottish DNA interest group


    This founding meeting is open to anyone who has experience or an interest in using DNA for genealogical or family history research.  The meeting will be held Saturday January 18th at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland.  Click here to read more.

  • Leg bone gives up oldest human DNA

     

    The discovery of DNA in a 400,000-year-old human thigh bone will open up a new frontier in the study of our ancestors.  That's the verdict cast by human evolution experts on an analysis in Nature journal of the oldest human genetic material ever sequenced.  Click here to read the entire story in BBC News.

  • The British: A Genetic Journey by Alistair Moffat


    Debbie Kennett has written a review of a new book from Alastair Moffat, co-founder of several DNA testing companies in the UK.  Click here to read her review.

  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA


    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 12/13/2013


    Due Date
    , Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

    12/11/2013, 536, 308603, Family Finder and Y-DNA 37

    01/15/2014, 544, 275787, Mt-DNA Plus

    01/22/2014, 545, 53092, DF13

    01/22/2014, 545, 283893, Refine 12 to 67 markers

    01/24/2014, 544, 315178, Y-DNA 37

    01/30/2014, 546, 29631, L513

    01/30/2014, 546, N116909, Family Finder, Mt-DNA Plus, and Y-DNA 37

    02/08/2014, 546, 318116, Comprehensive Genome

    02/28/2014, 543, 56277, Big Y

    02/28/2014, 546, 259717, Refine 25 to 37 markers

    02/28/2014, 544, 191679, Big Y

    02/28/2014, 542, 93184, Big Y


    EXPLANATION OF TESTS
    :

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,and R.

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

  • RootsTech 2014 announces exciting speaker lineup

    RootsTech is an annual, global family history event hosted by FamilySearch. This three-day conference (February 6–8, 2014) is designed to showcase how to discovery, share, and preserve your family history.  Click here to read more in the FamilySearch blog.

  • FTDNA Holiday Sale on DNA tests


    Family Tree DNA announced their holiday sale which will extend until December 31.  The Y-DNA 37 marker test is being offered for $119.  Click here to view the other reduced tests and to order your DNA test.

  • Skeletal remains raise new questions about First Americans

    Results from a DNA study of a young boy's skeletal remains believed to be 24,000 years old could turn the archaeological world upside down -- it's been demonstrated that nearly 30 percent of modern Native American's ancestry came from this youngster's gene pool, suggesting First Americans came directly from Siberia, according to a research team that includes a Texas A&M University professor.  Click here to read more in Science Daily.

  • December newsletter has been posted

     

    The December issue of our newsletter has been posted on this website under the News tab.  This month the newsletter contains information about DNA tests that are currently on sale at Family Tree DNA, a family story about William Ballard Phillips of Virginia, and a Christmas poem for obsessed genealogists!  We hope you enjoy reading the newsletter.  If you would like to submit a story or have any suggestions for the newsletter, please let us know!

  • Are you related to King Charlemagne?


    Nearly everyone currently living anywhere on the planet can claim to be the descendant of Charlemagne.  Click here to read an article that explains why.

  • FDA tells Google-backed 23andMe to halt DNA test service


    23andMe Inc., the Google Inc.-backed DNA analysis company co-founded by Anne Wojcicki, was told by U.S. regulators to halt sales of its main product because it’s being sold without “marketing clearance or approval.”  Click here to read more in Bloomberg.

  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA


    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 11/22/2013:


    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    11/20/2013, 536, 53092, DF21, M37

    12/07/2013, 537, 310463, Family Finder and MT-DNA Full Sequence

    12/11/2013, 536, 308603, Family Finder and Y-DNA 37

    12/13/2013, 538, 311661, MT-DNA Full Sequence

    12/19/2013, 540, 268282, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    12/28/2013, 540, 313095, Y-DNA 37

    12/31/2013, 540, 314347, Y-DNA 12

    01/02/2014, 542, N39708, Family Finder

    01/02/2014, 542, 93184, Big Y

    01/08/2014, 543, 56277, Big Y

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,and R.

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

  • Mystery humans spiced up ancients' rampant sex lives


    Genome analysis suggests interbreeding between modern humans, Neanderthals, Denisovans and a mysterious archaic population.  Click here to read more Nature.com.

  • Research Center Lab Tour

    Roberta Estes has posted a tour of FTDNA's lab on her blog at this link.

  • Discussing the personal genomics revolution

    In the last ten years, countless personal genomics companies have popped up. From 23andMe to Family Tree DNA to Ancestry.com, these services mostly focus on health markers and genealogy. Undoubtedly, those are excellent uses for genetic testing but that isn’t the complete story of the human genome.  Click here to read more in ExtremeTech.

  • Have you used the Family Search Free Lookup Service?


    According to Dick Eastman, this must be the best-kept secret in genealogy!  Click here to read more about it in Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter.

  • Our forefathers were fierce & our foremothers were faithful


    The logic is simple.  One can compare Y chromosomal lineages to surnames.  Click here to read more in Gene Expression.

  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA


    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 10/30/2013:


    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    11/14/2013, 535, 26802, Family Finder

    11/20/2013, 536, 259755, Refine 67 to 111 markers

    11/20/2013, 536, 53092, DF21, M37

    11/29/2013, 536, 308603, Family Finder and Y-DNA 37

    11/29/2013, 536, 308689, Y-DNA 37

    12/07/2013, 537, 310463, Family Finder and MT-DNA Full Sequence

    12/13/2013, 538, 311661, Family Finder, MT-DNA Full Sequence and Y-DNA 37


    EXPLANATION OF TESTS
    :

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,and R.

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

  • Ancient DNA links Native Americans with Europe



    Where did the first Americans come from?  Most researchers agree that Paleoamericans moved across the Bering Land Bridge from Asia sometime before 15,000 years ago, suggesting roots in East Asia.  But just where the source populations arose has long been a mystery.  Now comes a surprising twist, from the complete nuclear genome of a Siberian boy who died 24,000 year ago - the oldest complete genome of a modern human sequenced to date.  Click here to read more in Science Magazine.

  • Ireland's Back to our Past 2013

     

    Back To Our Past 2013 was held last weekend in Dublin.  The was plenty of curiosity evident on the Family Tree DNA stand, which was rarely without a bank of queueing visitors.  Click here to read more in Irish Genealogy News.

  • DAR to accept Y-DNA evidence for applications


    Beginning 1 January 2014, the Daughters of the American Revolution will accept Y-DNA evidence in support of new member applications and supplementals.  Click here to read more in an article written by Lynn Young, President General of the DAR.

  • Historians bid to use DNA to plot county family trees


    A group of amateur historians are trying to collect the DNA of people in Oxfordshire, England, to help build family trees.  The Oxfordshire DNA project is looking specifically for people whose ancestors lived in the county from at least the late 19th century.  Click here to read more in the Oxford Mail.

  • Link to Oetzi the Iceman found in living Austrians


    Austrian scientists have found that 19 Tyrolean men alive today are related to Oetzi the Iceman, whose 5,300-year-old frozen body was discovered in the Alps.  Their relationship was established through DNA analysis.  Click here to read more in BBC News Europe.

  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA


    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 10/13/2013:


    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    10/24/2013, 532, 58509, Refine 12 to 67 markers

    10/24/2013, 532, 85668, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    10/24/2013, 532, 176001, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    11/02/2013, 532, 273166, Y-DNA 37

    11/04/2013, 527, 299495, Y-DNA 67 + MT-DNA

    11/14/2013, 535, 26802, Family Finder

    11/14/2013, 536, 53092, DF21, M37

    11/14/2013, 535, 282875, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    11/20/2013, 536, 259755, Refine 67 to 111 markers

    11/23/2013, 535, 293112, MT-DNA Plus

    11/29/2013, 536, 308603, Family Finder and Y-DNA 37

    11/29/2013, 536, 308689, Y-DNA 37

    12/07/2013, 537, 310463, Family Finder and MT-DNA Full Sequence


    EXPLANATION OF TESTS
    :

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,and R.

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

  • European origins laid bare by DNA


    DNA from ancient skeletons has revealed how a complex patchwork of prehistoric migrations fashioned the modern European gene pool.  Click here to read the entire article in the science and environment section of BBC News and thanks to our British member Alan Phillips for the tip.

  • Most Ashkenazi Jews are genetically Europeans

    The origin of the Ashkenazi Jews, who come most recently from Europe, has largely been shrouded in mystery. But a new study suggests that at least their maternal lineage may derive largely from Europe.

    Though the finding may seem intuitive, it contradicts the notion that European Jews mostly descend from people who left Israel and the Middle East around 2,000 years ago. Instead, a substantial proportion of the population originates from local Europeans who converted to Judaism, said study co-author Martin Richards, an archaeogeneticist at the University of Huddersfield in England.

    Click here to read more in the science section of NBC News and our thanks to member Doyle Phillips for submitting this news item.

  • The Blonde Map of Europe


    Here is a link to an interesting map indicating the varying degrees of 'blondness' in Europe.

  • Ancestry.com acquires FindAGrave.com


    With over 100 million memorials and 75 million photos, Find A Grave has amassed an unparalleled collection of burial information. Over the past 18 years, it has grown to become an invaluable resource for genealogists, history buffs and cemetery preservationists. Find A Grave will become a wholly owned subsidiary of Ancestry.com, and will continue to be managed by its founder, Jim Tipton.  Click here to read more in Dear Myrtle.

  • Phillipses in the Revoluntionary War


    One of our members sent me a link to this website that is a list of every man named Phillips in the American Revolution.  Thanks for the tip, Lee!

  • Map of where America came from



    Here is a link to a truly captivating map that shows the ancestry of every one of the 317 million people who call the melting pot of American home on a county by county basis.

  • Tests in progress at Family Tree DNA

     


    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 09/29/2013


    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    10/07/2013, 527, 299495, Y-DNA 67 + MT-DNA

    10/09/2013, 530, 275787, 464X and L159.2

    10/14/2013, 524, 109920, Refine 67 to 111 markers

    10/21/2013, 525, 196407, Refine 67 to 111 markers

    10/24/2013, 532, 58509, Refine 12 to 67 markers

    10/24/2013, 532, 85668, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    10/24/2013, 532, 176001, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    11/02/2013, 532, 273166, Y-DNA 37

    11/14/2013, 535, 26802, Family Finder

    11/14/2013, 535, 282875, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    11/23/2013, 535, 293112, MT-DNA Plus


    EXPLANATION OF TESTS
    :

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,and R.

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

  • Phillips bible for sale on ebay

     


    There is an antique bible for sale on ebay at this link.  Surnames mentioned in the bible include Phillips, Lines, Van Sickle and Race.  The Phillips line appears to be Canadian.  According to files on Ancestry.com, this line of Phillips traces back to a Loyalist named Thomas Phillips who was born in New Jersey on 24 September 1745 and died in New Brunswick, Canada on 18 October 1809.  Thomas fled to Canada during the American Revolution.

  • New PBS show called 'Genealogy Roadshow'


    At the Belmont Mansion in Nashville, the first episode of PBS's new series "Genealogy Roadshow" which premiered at 8 p.m. last Monday night uncovered stories about Tennessee citizens and their mysterious relatives.  In addition to Nashville, Roadshow will feature participants from Austin, Detroit and San Francisco.  Click here to read more in The Tennessean.

  • Infographic shows distribution of red-heads in Europe

    Red hair is caused by a series of mutations in a gene located on chromosome 16.  As a recessive trait, the gene must be inherited from both the father and the mother in order to manifest itself.  Click here to read more on Planet Ivy.

  • DNA Double Take


    Scientists are finding that it’s quite common for an individual to have multiple genomes. Some people, for example, have groups of cells with mutations that are not found in the rest of the body.  Some have genomes that came from other people.  Click here to read more in the NY Times.

  • How Your Body Makes DNA!


    Click here to watch DNA molecular visualizations created as a resource to help teachers all around the world teach what the actual mechanism for building DNA in the cells looks like.  Thanks to member Doyle Phillips for this tip!

  • Map of Europe through the ages



    Here is a link to a fascinating map of Europe through the ages from 1000 AD to the present showing the ever-changing country boundaries.

  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA


    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 09/16/2013


    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    08/21/2013, 523, 93184, Various SNPs

    09/04/2013, 525, 196407, Refine 67 to 111 markers

    09/16/2013, 524, 109920, Refine 67 to 111 markers

    09/27/2013, 527, 299495, Y-DNA 67 + MT-DNA

    10/09/2013, 530, 275787, 464X and L159.2

    10/24/2013, 532, 58509, Refine 12 to 67 markers

    10/24/2013, 532, 85668, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    10/24/2013, 532, 176001, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    11/02/2013, 532, 273166, Y-DNA 37


    EXPLANATION OF TESTS
    :

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,and R.

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

  • Burke's Peerage Online


    Burke's Peerage Online is now available at this link.  Burke’s Peerage is the definitive guide to the genealogy and heraldry of the Peerage and Landed Gentry of the United Kingdom, the historical families of Ireland and the Commonwealth of Nations, the Imperial, Royal and mediatised families of Europe, the Presidential and distinguished families of the United States of America, and other prominent families worldwide.

  • Common mistakes often made with Family Tree data


    FamilySearch Family Tree has been available to everyone since March 2013. Since then, there have been new features and enhancements. During this time,
    concerns related to living records and some features like delete person or merging records have emerged.  Click here to read more in FamilySearch Blog.

  • FTDNA faces a lawsuit over breast cancer test


    Myriad Genetics is suing Family Tree DNA and others for offering a breast cancer DNA test.  Click here to read more in Dick Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter.

  • The Irish DNA Atlas - Mapping Genealogy


    The Irish DNA Atlas was started in 2011 as a collaboration between the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland and the Genealogical Society of Ireland.  The Atlas aims to identify genetic markers that arose in specific areas of Ireland.  Click here to read the whole story in the Irish Times. 

  • The benefits and limits of DNA sequencing

     

    Jeanne and Andy Nadeau had one gnawing question about their large family: Would the hearing loss that affects half of their busy, boisterous household of 10 children worsen as the children grew older?  Click here to read the whole story in The Boston Globe.

  • Why am I a Neanderthal?


    Here is a link to an interesting article in the August 2013 issue of the Genographic newsletter.  

  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA


    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 09/02/2013

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    08/21/2013, 523, 93184, Various SNPs

    09/04/2013, 525, 196407, Refine 67 to 111 markers

    09/16/2013, 524, 109920, Refine 67 to 111 markers

    09/27/2013, 527, 299495, Y-DNA 67 + MT-DNA

    10/09/2013, 530, 275787, 464X and L159.2

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,and R.

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

  • Sergey Brin and Anne Wojcicki have split


    Google co-founder Sergey Brin and 23andMe co-founder Anne Wojcicki, one of Silicon Valley’s most high-profile couples, are living apart.  23andMe is a DNA testing company.  Click here to read more in All Things D.

  • Dentist hopes to clone John Lennon


    A Canadian dentist is hoping to clone John Lennon
     using DNA from one of the singer's rotten teeth. Michael Zuk, who bought Lennon's molar at a 2011 auction, has begun sequencing the former Beatle's DNA.  Click here to read more in The Guardian.

  • DNA unlocks Hispanic-Jewish history


    The hidden Jewish heritage of who knows how many Hispanics is coming to light through DNA and genetic testing.  Click here to watch a video on YouTube.

  • Skeleton could be Saxon king or bishop


    A skeleton found in Lincoln Castle, Lincolnshire, England, could belong to a Saxon king or bishop, according to archaeologists.  The skeleton is in a stone sarcophagus believed to date from about 900AD.  The team has been carrying out DNA examinations on other skeletons found nearby.  Click here to read more on BBC News.

  • Amazing Twin Sisters; One is Black and One is White


    Twins are a rarity as is, whether they be identical or fraternal, but when one is black with brown eyes, and the other blue-eyed, blonde and pale-skinned, many of us can't help but ask ourselves: “Is that possible?”  Click here to read more in Naturally Moi.

  • Believe it or not, we really ARE brothers!


    A 17-year old boy from Yorkshire, England, built a DNA testing machine in his bedroom to find out why he has straight brown hair and his brother has curly red hair.  Click here to read the whole story in Daily Mail.

  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA


    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 08/18/2013


    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    08/21/2013, 523, 93184, Various SNPs

    08/21/2013, 523, 219904, Family Finder

    08/21/2013, 523, 243435, Family Finder

    08/21/2013, 523, 246259, Family Finder

    08/21/2013, 523, 254745, Family Finder

    08/28/2013, 524, 53092, L21 SNP Test

    08/28/2013, 524, 109920, Refine 67 to 111 markers

    09/04/2013, 525, 196407, Refine 67 to 111 markers

    09/27/2013, 527, 299495, Y-DNA 67 + MT-DNA


    EXPLANATION OF TESTS
    :

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,and R.

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

  • Grandma's experiences leave a mark on your genes


    Your ancestors' lousy childhoods or excellent adventures might change your personality, bequeathing anxiety or resilience by altering the epigenetic expressions of genes in the brain.  Click here to read more in Discover.

  • Meg Phillips appointed as NARA's External Affairs Liaison


    As external affairs liaison within the Office of Strategy and Communications Office, Meg Phillips will manage the National Archive's relationships with stakeholder groups, including professional organizations of archivists, records managers, and historians as well as public interest groups.  Click here to read more in Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter.

  • Y-DNA of the British Monarchy


    A review was made of existing genetic genealogy findings that infer characteristics of the Y-DNA of members of the British Monarchy. Nine sustained Y-DNA lineages since the year 927 CE were noted as dynastic groups. Haplogroup and haplotype characteristics of three of the dynasties were presented with two more dynasties noted as testable but unpublished.  Click here to read more in the Surname DNA Journal.

  • DNA demonstrates how closely everyone is related


    New DNA research has confirmed that everyone on Earth is related to everyone else on the planet.  Click here to read more in Phys Org News.

  • Bid to examine 'King Alfred the Great' remains


    A bid has been submitted to analyse remains from an unmarked grave at St. Bartholomew's Church in Winchester, England, to see if they belong to King Alfred the Great.   DNA testing could be an option.  Click here to read more in BBC News. 

  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA


    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 08/08/2013


    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    08/21/2013, 523, 93184, Various SNPs

    08/21/2013, 523, 219904, Family Finder

    08/21/2013, 523, 243435, Family Finder

    08/21/2013, 523, 246259, Family Finder

    08/21/2013, 523, 254745, Family Finder

    08/28/2013, 524, 53092, L21 SNP Test

    08/28/2013, 524, 109920, Refine 67 to 111 markers

    09/04/2013, 525, 196407, Refine 67 to 111 markers

    09/11/2013, 526, 265897, Family Finder

    09/27/2013, 527, 299495, Y-DNA 67 + MT-DNA


    EXPLANATION OF TESTS
    :

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,and R.

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

  • DNA evidence links Boston Strangler suspect to killing


    Authorities in Boston have announced that nearly 50-year-old evidence has produced a DNA match that links Albert DeSalvo, long suspected as the Boston Strangler responsible for 11 slayings, to the death of one of the victims, Mary Sullivan.  Click here to read more in the Los Angeles Times.

  • Archaeology: The milk revolution


    When a single genetic mutation first let ancient Europeans drink milk, it set the stage for a continental upheaval.  Click here to read the whole story in Nature, the international weekly journal of science.

  • Genetic 'Adam' and 'Eve' Uncovered


    Almost every man alive can trace his origins to one man who lived about 135,000 years ago, new research suggests. And that ancient man likely shared the planet with the mother of all women.  Click here to read more in Yahoo News.

  • Genetic testing improved student learning


    Students who had their genomes tested as part of a groundbreaking medical school course on personalized medicine improved their knowledge of the class materials by an average of 31 percent compared with those who didn’t undergo the testing, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.  Click here to read more.

  • Oldest Inland European Fort Found in Appalachians


    The remains of the earliest European fort in the interior of what is now the continental United States have been discovered by a team of archaeologists, providing new insight into the start of the U.S. colonial era and the all-too-human reasons spoiling Spanish dreams of gold and glory.  Click here to read more in Past Horizons.

  • Tests in progress at Family Tree DNA

     


    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 07/26/2013

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    08/07/2013, 521, 228279, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    08/21/2013, 523, 93184, Various SNPs

    08/21/2013, 523, 219904, Family Finder

    08/21/2013, 523, 243435, Family Finder

    08/21/2013, 523, 246259, Family Finder

    08/21/2013, 523, 254745, Family Finder

    08/28/2013, 524, 53092, L21 SNP Test

    08/28/2013, 524, 84729, Family Finder

    08/28/2013, 524, 109920, Refine 67 to 111 markers

    08/28/2013, 524, 152954, Family Finder

    08/28/3013, 524, 202983, Family Finder

    09/04/2013, 525, 196407, Refine 67 to 111 markers

    09/11/2013, 526, 265897, Family Finder


    EXPLANATION OF TESTS
    :

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,and R.

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

  • Evidence of cannibalism found in Spanish archaeological dig


    Near the northern Spanish city of Burgos, in the Sierra de Atapuerca, can be found the remains of the "oldest Europeans," who lived a million years ago. New discoveries are being made all the time.

    Read more here.

  • Inbreeding isn't really as bad as you think it is

    There's no way of escaping the fact that inbreeding does increase the risk of birth defects, particularly over multiple generations, and it can have some fairly horrific consequences. That said, the risks of limited inbreeding seem to be pretty massively overstated, and inbreeding by slightly more distant relatives like third cousins might actually confer a significant benefit.  Click here to read more at i09.com.

  • Making of Europe unlocked by DNA

     

    DNA sequenced from nearly 40 ancient skeletons has shed light on the complex prehistoric events that shaped modern European populations.  Click here to read more in an article by Paul Rincon, science editor of BBC News.

  • Solving DNA puzzles is overwhelming computer systems

     

    Improvements in computer programs have not kept pace with the enhancements and widespread use of the sequencers that are cranking out huge amounts of DNA data. The result is, the puzzle cannot be pieced together in a timely manner.  Click here to read more in Esciencenews.

  • Myriad sues competitors over cancer gene test


    Myriad Genetics Inc. is suing two privately-held competitors to stop it from selling a genetic test that competes with Myriad's BRACAnalysis breast and ovarian cancer test.  Click here to read more in BloombergBusinessweek.

  • FTDNA's Sizzling Summer Sale

     

    Beginning on Thursday, June 27, 2013 and running until Friday, July 26, 2013, Family Tree DNA will offer the following:
     
    Family Finder was $289 Now $99
    mtDNA Full Sequence was $289 Now $189
    Y-DNA37 was $169 Now $129
    Y-DNA67 was $268 Now $208
    Y-DNA111 was $359 Now $308
    Family Finder + Y-DNA37 was $368 Now $228
    Family Finder + Y-DNA67 was $467 Now $307
    Family Finder + mtDNAFullSequence was $398 Now $288
    Comprehensive Genome (Y-DNA67, FMS & FF) was $666 Now $496
     

    ALL ORDERS MUST BE PLACED AND PAID FOR BY 11:59pm CST, JULY 26, 2013, TO RECEIVE THESE SPECIAL PRICES.  CLICK HERE TO ORDER YOUR TEST THROUGH OUR PHILLIPS DNA PROJECT.
  • Tests in progress at Family Tree DNA


    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 07/12/2013

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    08/07/2013, 521, 69666, Family Finder

    08/07/2013, 521, 228279, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    08/07/2013, 521, 245862, FGS or Mega MT-DNA

    08/14/2013, 522, 207489, Family Finder

    08/21/2013, 523, 93184, Various SNPs

    08/21/2013, 523, 151873, Warrior Gene Test

    08/21/2013, 523, 219904, Family Finder

    08/21/2013, 523, 243435, Family Finder

    08/21/2013, 523, 246259, Family Finder

    08/21/2013, 523, 254745, Family Finder

    08/28/2013, 524, 53092, L21 SNP Test

    08/28/2013, 524, 84729, Family Finder

    08/28/2013, 524, 109920, Refine 67 to 111 markers

    08/28/2013, 524, 152954, Family Finder

    08/28/3013, 524, 202983, Family Finder

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,and R.

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

  • DNA links 5,500 year-old remains to a living woman

    Scientists have traced a genetic descent from 5,500 year-old remains to a second set of 2,500 year-old female remains found nearby and, amazingly, to a woman still living close to both prehistoric sites on British Columbia’s northern coast.  Click here to read more in Abroad in the Yard.

  • Melba Ketchum and the Bigfoot Genome


    How do you get one group of people who looks at the evidence and sees contamination, while another decides "The data conclusively prove that the Sasquatch exists"? To find out, we went through the paper's data carefully, then talked to Ketchum to understand the reasoning behind the work.  Click here to read the entire article in Arstechnica.

  • Genomics England, a new UK company


    Genomics England is a new company set up by the UK's Department of Health to help deliver the 100k Genome Project first announced by Prime Minister David Cameron in December 2012.  Click here to read more about it.

  • Sisters connect with 23andMe


    Greta had given up on ever finding her mother so by the time she joined 23andMe it wasn't really about finding family members.  She just wanted to learn a little bit more about herself.  Click here to read more in the 23andMe blog.

  • Who are the Picts? DNA finds an answer


    A recently discovered DNA marker suggests that 10% of Scottish men are directly descended from the Picts.  Click here to read more in a press release from a new company named ScotlandsDNA.

  • Tests in progress at Family Tree DNA


    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 06/27/2013


    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    01/31/2013, 494, 93184, Various SNPs

    07/26/2013, 520, 281543, Y-DNA 12

    07/31/2013, 520, 282552, Refine 25 to 37 markers

    07/31/2013, 520, 229720, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    08/07/2013, 521, 69666, Family Finder

    08/07/2013, 521, 228279, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    08/07/2013, 521, 231510, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    08/07/2013, 521, 245862, FGS or Mega MT-DNA

    08/09/2013, 520, 290966, Y-DNA 37

    08/14/2013, 522, 207489, Family Finder

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,and R.

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

  • Snail genes reveal human migration to Ireland


    A genetic similarity between snail fossils found in Ireland and the Eastern Pyrenees suggests humans migrated from southern Europe to Ireland 8,000 years ago.  Click here to read more in BBC News.

  • More than 80,000 genealogy publications now online



    One of the greatest genealogy resources available today is the huge collection of digitized genealogy and family history publications from the archives of some of the most important family history libraries in the world.  Dick Eastman says "when I travel to various genealogy conferences and societies, I am often amazed at how many genealogists are unaware of these free resources. Not only are the books and other publications available free of charge, you don't even have to pay for gas to visit these libraries!"  Click here to read more in Dick Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter.

  • President Barack Obama's Irish Ancestry


    On 17 June 2013, Michelle Obama and her two daughters, Malia Ann and Sasha, took part in a private genealogy event about the President's Irish ancestors at a special exhibit at the Long Room in the Old Library in Trinity College Dublin.  Click here to read more at Eneclann, a Trinity College Campus Company.

  • Priceless historical documents found in Alabama


    After 60 years of mystery, thousands of pages of Madison County, Alabama, historic documents are back in the hands of county record keepers, thanks to a local family.  Click here to read more on a Huntsville, Alabama, news station.

  • Researching before 1837 in the UK


    As we follow our roots further and further back into the past we will inevitably reach a point where we lose the support of our safety net and are forced to continue our quest without the familiar, reassuring assistance of birth, marriage and death certificates and census returns.  Click here to read more in a blog written by David Annal on Genes Reunited.

  • FTDNA's Summer Upgrade Sale

     
    From June 12, 2013 through June 19, 2013:
     
    Y-DNA 12 to 25 was $49 Now $35
    Y-DNA 12 to 37 was $99 Now $69
    Y-DNA 12 to 67 was $189 Now $148
    Y-DNA 25 to 37 was $49 Now $35
    Y-DNA 25 to 67 was $148 Now $114
    Y-DNA 25 to 111 was $249 Now $224
    Y-DNA 37 to 67 was $99 Now $79
    Y-DNA 37 to 111 was $220 Now $188
    Y-DNA 67 to 111 was $129 Now $109
     
    To order an upgrade at these special prices, log into your personal page with your kit number and password. Click on the "Order Upgrade" button located on the right side of the menu bar. Then click on the "Special Offers" button.
    ALL ORDERS MUST BE PLACED AND PAID FOR BY 11:59pm, JUNE 19, 2013, TO RECEIVE THE SALE PRICE. 
  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA

     

    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 06/13/2013

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    01/31/2013, 494, 93184, Various SNPs

    06/19/2013, 514, 280691, Family Finder

    06/19/2013, 514, 254745, P312

    06/19/2013, 514, 280691, Family Finder

    06/19/2013, 514, N114148, Family Finder

    07/19/2013, 517, 285744, Y-DNA 37

    07/26/2013, 520, 281543, Y-DNA 12

    07/31/2013, 520, 282552, Refine 25 to 37 markers

    07/31/2013, 520, 229720, Refine 37 to67 markers

    08/09/2013, 520, 290966, Y-DNA 37


    EXPLANATION OF TESTS
    :

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,and R.

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

  • Do you own your genealogy data?


    Here is a link to an interesting take on this subject written by Dick Eastman of Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter.

  • What happened when I had my genome sequenced


    It is 10 years since the human genome was first sequenced.  In that time the cost per person has fallen from $2.7bn to just $5,000.  Revealing our full DNA will revolutionise medicine - but it will also raise huge eithical questions about what we do with the information.  Click here to read more in an article in The Guardian.

  • Geneticists push for global data-sharing


    It is a paradox that bedevils genomic medicine: despite near-universal agreement that doctors and geneticists should exchange more data, there has been scant movement towards achieving this goal.  Now, a consortium of 69 institutions in 13 countries hopes to address this problem.  Click here to read more in Nature.com.

  • 1921 Census of Canada


    The 1921 census of Canada was taken on June 1, 1921.  It has  been locked up ever since to protect individuals' private information.  The required time has now expired and Statisitics Canada has given the records to Library and Archives Canada for publication.  Click here to read more in Eastman's Online Genealogical Newsletter.

  • Supreme Court says Police can take DNA swabs from arrestees


    A sharply divided Supreme Court on Monday said police can routinely take DNA from people they arrest, equating a DNA cheek swab to other common jailhouse procedures like fingerprinting.  Click here to read more in boston.com.

  • Caveman bones yield oldest modern human DNA


    What may be the oldest fragments of the modern human genome found yet have now been revealed — DNA from the 7,000-year-old bones of two cavemen unearthed in Spain, researchers say.

    These findings suggest the cavemen there were not the ancestors of the people found in the region today, investigators added.  Click here to read the whole story in Live Science.

  • Vanessa Williams explains how DNA powers her Family Tree


    Most of us are curious about our family lineage. For Vanessa Williams, who recently took part in the show “Who Do You Think You Are” and explored her family’s history, the task was both surprising and informative.  Here, she talks about what she learned and how she plans to use that information

  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA


    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 05/28/2013:


    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    01/31/2013, 494, 93184, Various SNPs

    06/03/2013, 505, 111792, Family Finder

    06/03/2013, 509, 280691, Super DNA

    06/19/2013, 514, 11630, Refine 25 to 67 markers

    06/19/2013, 514, 254745, P312

    06/19/2013, 514, 280691, Family Finder

    06/19/2013, 514, N114148, Family Finder

    07/12/2013, 516, 288896, Y-DNA 67

    07/19/2013, 517, 285744, Y-DNA 37


    EXPLANATION OF TESTS
    :

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,and R.

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

  • Who's Your Daddy? The perils of personal genomics


    In the spring of 2012, a 34-year-old and her older brother spit some saliva into plastic tubes and shipped them off to 23andMe, a personal genomics company, for consumer-grade scans of their DNA.  First Jackie learned her brother was her uncle.  Then things got a little weird.  Click here to read the whole story in Slate.

  • "Who Do You Think You Are?" is back


    In a press release that was issued on May 22, it was announced that "Who Do You Think You Are?" will be returning to the airwaves in two months.  Click here to read more in Dave Dowell's blog.

  • Genetic Genealogy Plus for Adoptees


    Searching for birth relatives can be difficult in some states and impossible in others using standard adoption search methods but Genetic Genealogy Plus breaks down the barriers set up by closed records.  Click here to read more in Dick Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter.

  • DNA - Brick Wall Buster?


    Here is a link to a video on YouTube posted by Maurice Gleeson with regard to a talk he gave at the Irish Genealogical Research Society on 20 March 2013.

  • DNA reveals origin of Greece's ancient Minoan culture


    Analysis of DNA from ancient remains on the Greek island of Crete suggests the Minoans were indigenous Europeans, shedding new light on a debate over the provenance of this ancient culture.  Click here to read more in BBC News.

  • The $1000 Genome, the $1,000,000 Interpretation


    Here is a link to an interesting talk by Keven Davies, author of "The $1,000 Genome", that was delivered at the HGP10 Symposium on April 25, 2013.

  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA


    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 05/14/2013:

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    01/31/2013, 494, 93184, Various SNPs

    05/31/2013, 510, 279302, Family Finder

    06/03/2013, 505, 111792, Family Finder

    06/03/2013, 509, 280691, Super DNA

    06/05/2013, 512, 229720, M222

    06/05/2013, 512, 262731, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    06/14/2013, 512, 282552, Y-DNA 25

    06/19/2013, 514, 11630, Refine 25 to 37 markers

    06/19/2013, 514, 280691, Family Finder

    06/19/2013, 514, 281786, Backbone

    06/19/2013, 514, 283893, Backbone

    06/19/2013, 514, N114148, Family Finder

    06/21/2013, 515, 284217, Y-DNA 37

    06/28/2013, 514, 285304, Y-DNA 12

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,and R.

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

  • Mitochondrial DNA testing at a new low price


    HOUSTON, May 9, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- 
    FamilyTreeDNA.con, the genetic genealogy arm of Gene by Gene, Ltd., has lowered the price of its mid-level maternal line mtDNA test to $49, effective immediately.  The company announced it will offer its mtDNAPlus product at a two-third price reduction permanently, in just its latest step toward universal access by individuals to their personal genetic data.  Click here to read more in a blog written by genealogist Debbie Kennett.

  • What makes the British?


    An extraordinary DNA project run by Oxford scientists has mapped out the DNA of the Peoples of the British Isles.  Click here to read more in Oxford Today, the Oxford University magazine. 

  • Charlemagne's DNA and our Universal Royalty


    According to a statistician named Joseph Chang, if you look at the ancestry of a living population of people, you’ll eventually find a common ancestor of all of them. That’s not to say that a single mythical woman somehow produced every European by magically laying a clutch of eggs. All this means is that as you move back through time, sooner or later some of the lines in the genealogy will cross, meeting at a single person.  Click here to read more in National Geographic.

  • Mocavo announces Genealogy Karma


    Mocavo is excited to announce the launch of Genealogy Karma. 
     Modeled after Random Acts of Genealogical Kindness, Mocavo hopes to empower the Mocavo community and connect researchers all around the country. If you’re looking for documents, records, or photos from an ancestor who lived far away, Mocavo will connect you with family history volunteers who can do this research for you in other cities. Likewise, if you’d like to give back to the Mocavo community and have a little time to donate, you can sign up as a volunteer.  Click here to learn more.

  • Gravestone Symbolism


    Here is a link to a list of gravestone symbols and their meanings.  Thanks to Doyle Phillips for sending us this link. 

  • Digging Up Dad, Exhumation and Forensic Testing


    Here is link to a fascinating blog written by genealogist Roberta Estes.

  • Tests in progress at Family Tree DNA


    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 04/30/2013:

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    01/31/2013, 494, 93184, Various SNPs

    04/24/2013, 506, 267404, Backbone

    05/06/2013, 505, 111792, Family Finder

    05/24/2013, 509, 280691, Super DNA

    05/29/2012, 511, 196407, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    05/29/2013, 511, 278869, Refine 12 to 37 markers

    05/29/2013, 511, 279031, Refine 12 to 37 markers

    05/31/2013, 510, 279302, Family Finder

    05/31/2013, 510, 281453, Super DNA

    05/31/2013, 511, 281786, Y-DNA 37

    06/05/2013, 512, 229720, M222

    06/05/2013, 512, 262731, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    06/11/2013, 513, 201688, Upgrade MT-DNA

    06/11/2013, 513, 268282, MT-DNA Full Sequence

    06/14/2013, 512, 282552, Y-DNA 25

    06/14/2013, 512, 282875, Y-DNA 37


    EXPLANATION OF TESTS
    :

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,and R.

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

  • Casting PBS's "Genealogy Roadshow"


    The groundbreaking Documentary Series "Genealogy Roadshow" will be in Austin, Nashville, San Francisco and Detroit reuniting families with long lost relatives, and answering questions about their past, their history and their lineage.  Click here to find out how you can get on the show.

  • Redheads Direct Descendant of First Redhead


    ScotlandsDNA, a company that focuses on people's heritage, has developed a new DNA test that allows parents to see if they might have red-haired chilldren.  Every human in the world who carries one of the variants of the red-hair gene is a direct descendant of the first person to have it, the lab believes.  Click here to read more at CBS News.

  • National DNA Day Sale at FTDNA


    Family Tree DNA is commemorating National DNA Day with a sale that extends to 11:59 p.m. CDT on Thursday April 30th.  The 37 marker Y-DNA test is on sale for $119 and the 67 marker Y-DNA test is on sale for $199.  Click here to order a test kit through the Phillips DNA Project.

  • Online DNA mapping helps siblings find each other


    Click here to read or listen to an uplifting story on CBS News about how a brother and sister discovered the existence of each other through online DNA testing.

  • Getting started with records: census and BMDs


    Here is a link to an interesting article in the Genes Reunited Blog that discusses two sets of genealogical records most frequently used in the UK.

  • New Enhancements at FamilySearch


    FamilySearch has released a video and a written description of changes announced recently at RootsTech.  Click here to read more and watch the video on Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter.

  • Tests in progress at Family Tree DNA


    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 04/15/2013:

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    01/31/2013, 494, 93184, Various SNPs

    04/24/2013, 506, 229431, Y-DNA 37

    04/24/2013, 506, 267404, Backbone

    05/06/2013, 505, 111792, Family Finder

    05/08/2013, 508, 262961, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    05/10/2013, 507, 272231, Y-DNA 111

    05/17/2013, 508, 273201, Y-DNA 37

    05/29/2012, 511, 196407, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    05/29/2013, 511, 278869, Refine 12 to 37 markers

    05/29/2013, 511, 279031, Refine 12 to 37 markers

    05/31/2013, 511, 279302, Family Finder

    05/31/2013, 511, 281786, Y-DNA 37

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,and R.

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

  • Phillips inquiry in WDYTYA Magazine


    There is a Phillips inquiry in this month's WDYTYA Magazine at this link.  Thanks to Debbie Kennett for this tip.  Here is the text:

    "My great grandfather was born on 23 February 1886 in St Pancras Workhouse. Named as Herman Phillips, the mother's name on the birth certificate is Lizzie Phillips of 22 Percy Street, Camden. I have been told that this was a boarding house/hotel.

    I have found Herman's birth and baptism in the workhouse records, and I have also found a Eliza Phillips being admitted on the day Herman was born. She was discharged on the 13 March 1886.

    I cannot seem to find Herman Phillips or his mother in the 1891 or 1901 census, although he does appear in 1911.

    But this is where is gets strange. His birth certificate gives his name as Herman Phillips, his two marriage and death certificates say Herman Frederick Phillips and his First World War service records all state his name as Frederick Phillips.

    Does anyone know whether I could find out a bit more about his mother and whether they would appear on the 1891 or 1901 census?"


  • Woodbridge-Phillips 1728 duel in Boston


    A famous sword fight took place on Boston Common in July of 1728 between a man named Benjamin Woodbridge and a man named Henry Phillips.  Henry was supposedly a descendant of Deacon Nicholas Phillips of Boston, Massachusetts, and therefore a member of our Phillips Family DNA Group 18.  Click here to read the story on the website Celebrate Boston. 

  • Unfair to compare DNA testing to astrology

    Professor Mark Thomas may have a point in his critique of genetic ancestry testing companies. The line between popularising science and misleading the public is a very difficult one to draw, as responses to the recent BBC TV programme Meet the Izzards, in which Eddie Izzard traces the migration of his ancestors out of Africa and into Europe, illustrate. But Thomas's portrayal of what he calls "interpretative phylogeography" – the principal means by which those of us who study mitochondrial DNA and the Y chromosome draw conclusions about the dispersal history of modern humans – as "genetic astrology" has profound implications. Here he is taking on not just the commercial use of the scientific work, but the science itself – work that has been published in peer-reviewed articles in leading scientific journals. Can he really be right? Click here to read more in The Guardian.

  • Genealogy's often misspelled words


    Dick Eastman recently published an article in his newsletter that lists the most commonly misspelled words in genealogy.  Click here to brush up on your spelling!  As Dick says, when someone spells a word wrong, it feels like he or she is shouting "I don't know what I'm doing!"

  • 1787 Vellum Will of John Phillips, Mariner


    There is a 1787 original vellum will of John Phillips, a Mariner of Lympstone in Devon, for sale on E-Bay at this link.  The seller notes that it is in very good condition but with some discolouration and a tear through the seal.  Names mentioned in the will include son John Phillips, Gilbert Horwill, Ann Merry, Mary Oats and Joan Phillips.  Property in Lympstone to be divided between John and Joan Phillips.

  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA


    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 04/04/2013:

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    01/31/2013, 494, 93184, Various SNPs

    04/10/2013, 504, 135549, L371

    04/17/2013, 505, 111792, Family Finder

    04/17/2013, 505, 157462, Refine 67 to 111 markers

    04/17/2013, 508, 166559, M222

    04/17/2013, 505, 259755, L193

    04/24/2013, 506, 229431, Y-DNA 37

    04/24/2013, 506, 267404, Backbone

    05/08/2013, 508, 262961, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    05/10/2013, 507, 267832, Y-DNA 37

    05/10/2013, 507, 273212, Y-DNA 37

    05/10/2013, 507, 272231, Y-DNA 111

    05/17/2013, 507, 273201, Y-DNA 37

    05/24/2013, 509, 280633, Y-DNA 12


    EXPLANATION OF TESTS
    :

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,and R.

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

  • Why we are having less sex with our relatives


    The person you sat next to on the bus this morning is, on average, likely to be something like your sixth cousin.  But our mating patterns are changing.  Click here to read more in an article written by Steve Jones in The Telegraph.

  • Evidence of Inbreeding Revealed by Skulls of Early Humans


    Buried for 100,000 years at Xujiayao in the Nihewan Basin of northern China, the recovered skull pieces of an early human exhibit a now-rare congenital deformation that indicates inbreeding might well have been common among our ancestors, new research from the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Washington University in St. Louis suggests.  Click here to read more in Medical News Today.

  • Geneticists Estimate Publication Date Of The 'Iliad'


    Scientists who decode the genetic history of humans by tracking how genes mutate have applied the same technique to one of the Western world's most ancient and celebrated texts to uncover the date it was first written.  Click here to read more in Inside Science.

  • FTDNA Announcements: Price Change and Improvements


    Yesterday Family Tree DNA sent the following announcement to project administrators:


    It is with great satisfaction that we announce a permanent price change and other improvements that will positively impact your projects.

    Prices:
    Due to the recent upgrade of our state-of-the-art laboratory, coupled with research and development into increasing lab efficiency, we are able to permanently offer the basic Y-DNA12 test for $49 beginning April 1, 2013. The current sale of Y12 at $39 will end at 11:59PM CST, March 31,2013. We are also working on bringing down the price of the basic mtDNA test as well; we hope to have that accomplished during the first half of this year.

    We understand that several projects have a minimum requirement of 37 markers for the Y-DNA test, but we’ve learned through the promotion with the lower price point on the Y-DNA12 last month, that it did not reduce the number of orders at the 37-marker level. Therefore, there was a net gain for the database, not only by increasing the number of members, but also increasing the number of potential upgrades to higher levels.

    We hope that you can encourage family and friends who saw the price as a barrier to now come on board. It is our goal to ensure every single person is able to have the "DNA experience," at least at the basic level. We are working on a letter that you can send to family and friends to invite them to take advantage of the new pricing.

    Customer Service:

    Family Tree DNA is the only company exclusively dedicated to genetic genealogy and anthropology. We offer the widest range of tests, from the basic ones mentioned above to specific SNPs and all to way to the "Walk Through the Y" and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence.

    Every month our lab in Houston processes tens of thousands of discrete tests.

    Given the increase in the volume of orders and tests, we are adding additional people in our Customer Service department. These are all qualified personnel that receive very specific training and who give an individual answer to each email and phone call that they receive under almost every circumstance. Our policy always been to answer email between 24 to 48 hours (excluding on weekends), and we are working towards coming back to this norm. We apologize for the inconvenience that delays beyond this norm have caused and we appreciate your patience and support while this situation is being corrected.

    IT:

    Our IT Department has a number of responsibilities. The main ones are: 

    1. Making sure that our Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) works flawlessly so that there are no mix-ups in the lab or errors during processing.
    2. Making sure that results coming out of the lab are seamlessly integrated with the personal records from our customers.
    3. Writing the code for new features to be implemented, whether those features are conceived in-house or at the suggestion of our customers.

    Obviously, they also have to fix bugs, because as we know - unfortunately - bugs happen. Any of you that have iPhones, iPads or Android apps know that we receive almost daily notifications for updates which most of the time relate to bug fixes. That doesn’t mean we accept all bugs as inevitable—beyond a certain point they’re not acceptable, so we are also taking the necessary steps to improve this situation by hiring additional qualified people. We believe that the results will be noticed soon. Again, we apologize and appreciate your patience and support.

    * * *

    As we grow and remain the leading company in the field of genetic genealogy and anthropology, we want to recognize the vital contribution that you - the project administrators - have played in this field since we pioneered it in 2000. The recent groundbreaking paper "An African American Paternal Lineage Adds an Extremely Ancient Root to the Human Y Chromosome Phylogenetic Tree," published in the most prestigious journal in the field, The American Journal of Human Genetics, and widely mentioned in the press, was generated from a sample analyzed at our lab. The paper was authored by a group that included Family Tree DNA group administrators, our lab people and a member of our Scientific Advisory Board among others. This is a testament not just to the quality of FTDNA's science, but also to your contribution as citizen scientists over the years. For that we sincerely THANK YOU!

  • One in ten Scots men descended from Picts


    Research from ScotlandsDNA, a new ancestry testing company, suggests that 10% of Scottish men are directly descended from the Picts, a tribe of fierce, enigmatic people who battled with Rome's legions before seeming to disappear from history.  Click here to read more in Scotsman.com.

  • Phillips Surname in America Catalog to 1775


    One of our members, Doyle Phillips, has volunteered to maintain a page called Phillips Surname in America Catalog to 1775 on this website.  It is located under Phillips Research which is under The Community in the blue bar across the top of this page.  Doyle encourages you to submit your research to him and he will add it to this page.  Thanks for your idea and efforts, Doyle!

  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA


    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 03/22/2013:

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    01/31/2013, 494, 93184, Various SNPs

    03/25/2013, 499, 262102, Y-DNA 67

    03/25/2013, 499, 268404, MP7

    04/05/2013, 502, 270935, Y-DNA 37 + MT-DNAPlus

    04/10/2013, 504, 135549, L371

    04/10/2013, 504, 109920, Family Finder

    04/17/2013, 505, 111792, Family Finder

    04/17/2013, 505, 157462, Refine 67 to 111 markers

    04/17/2013, 508, 166559, M222

    04/17/2013, 505, 259755, L193

    04/19/2013, 504, 271571, Y-DNA 67

    04/24/2013, 501, 270499, Backbone

    04/24/2013, 506, 229431, Y-DNA 37

    04/24/2013, 506, 267404, Backbone

    05/08/2013, 508, 262961, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    05/10/2013, 507, 267832, Y-DNA 37

    05/10/2013, 507, 273212, Y-DNA 37

    05/10/2013, 507, 272231, Y-DNA 111

    05/17/2013, 507, 273201, Y-DNA 37

    05/17/2013, 508, 278869, Y-DNA 12

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

  • New Maps of Eurasian DNA


    A recent doctoral dissertation by Russian geneticist Oleg Balanovsky contains a number of fascinating maps pertaining to the distribution of both Y-DNA and mitochondrial DNA across Eurasia.  Click here to see the maps and read more in GeoCurrents.

  • Double Helix - The DNA Years


    An excellent BBC documentary called "Double Helix - The DNA Years" has been posted on You Tube at this link.

  • Sense about Genealogical DNA Testing


    The announcement of the publication of Sense About Science’s new briefing on Sense about Genetic Ancestry Testing 
    attracted substantial media coverage. However, some of the articles may have given the false impression that all DNA ancestry tests are "meaningless". This left some readers to wonder about the scientific credibility of the DNA testing used in the investigation of the presumed remains of Richard III or the tests taken by genealogists as part of their family history research. However, the briefing made it clear that "There are credible ways to use the genetic data from mtDNA or Y chromosomes in individual ancestry testing, such as to supplement independent, historical studies of genealogy." This combination of genealogical research with DNA testing is known as genetic genealogy, and is a more specific and rigorous application than the generalised “deep” ancestry tests critiqued in Sense About Genetic Ancestry Testing.  Click here to read more in Debbie Kennett's blog on Sense about Science.

  • Revolutionary Voices: A Last Muster Film



    Every school aged child in the United States learns about the "shot heard 'round the world" and the American Revolution, but how many have seen the faces of the men and women who lived it? Maureen Taylor spent ten years uncovering and authenticating over 200 photos of the Revolutionary War generation, and the stories behind them.  Click here to read more about this interesting project. 

  • ProQuest to distribute NewspaperArchive to libraries worldwide


    Want to find birth announcements, marriages, obituaries, and even social gossip about your ancestors?  NewspaperArchive often is the place to look. NewspaperArchive.com focuses on small, local newspapers. Those papers typically contain news articles, community news, national news, local news, sport news, current news, classified ads and historical data.  Now you will be able to view NewspaperArchive at your local library if that library subscribes to the new offering from ProQuest. Not all libraries will do that but I suspect that many will. Click here to read more in Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter.


  • Family Tree is Live on FamilySearch.org


    Family Tree is now live on FamilySearch.org and available to all users.  This opens up the contribution, collaboration, editing and sourcing tools of Family Tree to researchers - including family members - around the world.  Click here to read more in a FamilySearch Blog by Tara Bergeson.

  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA

     

    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 03/07/2013:

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    01/31/2013, 494, 93184, Various SNPs

    03/11/2013, 497, 60411, Refine 67 to 111 markers

    03/25/2013, 499, 262102, Y-DNA 67

    03/29/2013, 501, 267404, Y-DNA 67

    03/29/2013, 501, 265683, Y-DNA 37

    04/05/2013, 502, 268282, Family Finder + Y-DNA 37

    04/05/2013, 502, 270935, Y-DNA 37 + MT-DNAPlus

    04/10/2013, 497, 135549, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    04/10/2013, 504, 109920, Family Finder

    04/10/3013, 505, 135549, L371

    04/17/2013, 505, 111792, Family Finder

    04/17/2013, 505, 157462, Refine 67 to 111 markers

    04/19/2013, 504, 271571, Y-DNA 67

    04/24/2013, 505, 229431, Y-DNA 37

    04/24/2013, 501, 270499, Y-DNA 67

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O,and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

  • Y chromosome much older than previously thought


    University of Arizona geneticists have discovered the oldest known genetic branch of the human Y chromosome, the hereditary factor determining male sex.  The new divergent lineage, which was found in an individual who submitted his DNA to Family Tree DNA, branched from the Y chromosome tree before the first appearance of anatomically modern humans in the fossil record.  Click here to read more in UA News.

  • Who Do You Think You Are? LIVE! Days One, Two and Three


    Here is a link to a blog written by British genealogist Debbie Kennett who attended all three days of WDYTYA - Live in London.

  • March issue of newsletter has been posted


    The March issue of the newsletter has been posted on the News page of this website.  Just click on the News tab in the blue bar above and you can elect to read the newsletter in PDF, XPS or plain text format.

    This month the newsletter contains an update on the status of our Phillips DNA Project, an obituary on one of our members, Mary Jane Phillips-Matz, and a book review of "Scotland during the Plantation of Ulster" by David Dobson.

    We hope you enjoy the newsletter!  If you would like to submit a story or have any suggestions for the newsletter, please let us know.

  • Ethnic population county-by-county in USA


    Here is a link to a map that purportedly shows the major ethnic group county by county in the USA.  Keep in mind that each county is identified by a plurality of people from the 2000 census so this is self-reported data.  Also the map tells us nothing about how homogeneous or heterogeneous the population is in any given county.  Still, it is a very interesting map.

  • One million Brits 'descended from Romans'


    One million British men may be directly descended from the Roman legions which came, saw and conquered England and Wales almost two thousand years ago, a DNA study suggests.  Click here to read more in The Telegraph.

  • Scotland's DNA at WDYTYA


    Heather Calvert of Scotland's DNA has posted a blog at this link about their participation in this year's WDYTYA in London.

  • Y-DNA 12 marker test for only $39


    Family Tree DNA is offering its 12 marker Y-DNA test for only $39 for a limited time only.  This is a great price but keep in mind this is a very basic test and is better at proving to whom you are NOT related rather than to whom you are related.  However, if you are on a budget, this is an inexpensive way to start and you can always upgrade your test later when finances allow.  Orders must be placed and paid in full by the end of the sale, Tuesday, March 5, 2013.  Click here to order the test.

  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA


    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 02/19/2013:

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    01/31/2013, 494, 93184, Various SNPs

    02/06/2013, 495, 260617, Haplogroup Prediction

    02/15/2013, 496, 262731, Haplogroup Prediction

    02/20/2013, 497, 60411, Refine 67 to 111 markers

    02/20/2013, 497, 135549, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    02/27/2013, 498, 157462, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    03/04/2013, 490, 238578, Deep Clade

    03/06/2013, 499, 196882, Various SNPs

    03/06/2013, 499, 268404, Y-DNA 67

    03/20/2013, 501, 239385, Y-DNA 25

    03/20/2013, 501, 262961, Y-DNA 37

    03/20/2013, 501, 265683, Y-DNA 37

    03/20/2013, 501, 267404, Y-DNA 67

    03/20/2013, 501, 270499, Y-DNA 67

    03/20/2013, 501, 270862, Y-DNA 37

    03/27/2013, 502, 268282, Family Finder + Y-DNA 37

    03/27/2013, 502, 270935, Y-DNA 37 + MT-DNAPlus

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O, and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • A Genetic Glimpse Into Recent Human Evolution


    Gaining a deep insight into human evolution, researchers have identified a mutation in a critical human gene as the source of several distinctive traits that make East Asians different from other races.  Click here to read more in The New York Times and thanks to Doyle Phillips for supplying this tip.

  • Finding your roots with Findmypast


    Here is a link to a critique of the genealogical records available at Findmypast written by Family History Daily.  The site offers a wide assortment of records for those researching relatives from England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales.

  • DNA Haplogroups


    Here is a link to an in-depth article on DNA haplogroups on a website called Essay Web.  Our thanks to member Doyle Phillips for providing this tip to us.

  • A visit to FTDNA's lab


    Family Tree DNA is the only company in the field that has their own lab where they process everything from start to finish in their state-of-the-art facility in Houston.  Click here to read more and see photos in a blog written by CeCe Moore.

  • Who Do You Think You Are? LIVE! in London


    The largest annual genealogy event in the English-speaking world, possibly in the entire world, will be held February 22 through February 24 in London, England.  Based on the hit television show, Who Do You Think You Are?,
     the three-day expo at the Olympia Exhibition Hall in Kensington typically attracts 12,000 to 14,000 attendees every year.  Yes, that's fourteen THOUSAND.  This year the Phillips DNA Project will once again be offering free 37 marker Y-DNA tests during the expo to British men named Phillips or any variation of the name Phillips.  Please visit the ISOGG stand to obtain your free Y-DNA test.

  • People of Timbuktu save manuscripts from invaders


    Click here to read this great story of the efforts of an illiterate man and others to save ancient books and manuscripts in Timbuktu, Mali.

  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA


    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 02/05/2013:

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    01/31/2013, 494, 93184, Various SNPs

    02/06/2013, 495, 260617, Haplogroup Prediction

    02/11/2013, 490, 238578, Deep Clade

    02/15/2013, 496, 262731, Haplogroup Prediction

    02/20/2013, 497, 60411, Refine 67 to 111 markers

    02/20/2013, 497, 135549, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    02/25/2013, 495, 263111, MT-DNA

    02/27/2013, 498, 157462, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    02/27/2013, 498, 266076, Y-DNA 37

    03/06/2013, 499, 196882, Various SNPs

    03/06/2013, 499, 268404, Y-DNA 67

    03/20/2013, 501, 239385, Y-DNA 25

    03/20/2013, 501, 262961, Y-DNA 37

    03/20/2013, 501, 265683, Y-DNA 37

    03/20/2013, 501, 267404, Y-DNA 67

    03/20/2013, 501, 270499, Y-DNA 67

    03/20/2013, 501, 270862, Y-DNA 37

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O, and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • The USCIS Genealogy Program


    The USCIS Genealogy Program is a fee-for-service program providing family historians and other researchers with timely access to historical immigration and naturalization records of deceased immigrants.  Click here to learn more about the services and records offered and our thanks to member Doyle Phillips for this tip.

  • February newsletter has been posted


    The February 2013 issue of our Phillips DNA Project's newsletter has been posted on this website under the News tab where you can read it in PDF, XPS or plain text format.  This month the newsletter contains tips on how to use your personal page at Family Tree DNA and an article on a branch of our Phillips Family DNA Group 2 written by a Canadian member of Group 2.  We hope you enjoy reading the newsletter!  Please let us know if you want to submit a story for the newsletter or if you have any other suggestions.

  • Test-tube data: Storing information in DNA


    DNA is already used to store information in the form of genomes by every living organism on Earth.  Its prowess at that job is the reason that information scientists have been trying to co-opt it for their own uses.  Click here to read more in The Economist.

  • What is a Haplogroup?



    Think of a haplogroup as an ancestral clan, a large family, like the Celts or Vikings.  There are clans for the male Y chromosome and clans for maternal mitochondrial DNA.  Click here to read more in a blog written by Roberta Estes.

  • Who Do You Think You Are? LIVE! in London


    The largest annual genealogy event in the English-speaking world, possibly in the entire world, will be held near the end of next month in London, England. Based on the hit television show, Who Do You Think You Are?, the three-day expo at the Olympia Exhibition Hall in Kensington typically attracts 12,000 to 14,000 attendees every year. Yes, that's fourteen THOUSAND.  Click here to read more in Dick Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter.

  • Fossil human DNA traces line to modern Asians


    Researchers have been able to trace a line between some of the earliest modern humans to settle in China and people living in the region today.  The evidence comes from DNA extracted from a 40,000 year old leg bone found in a cave near Beijing.  Click here to read more in BBC News.

  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA


    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 01/21/2013:

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    01/21/2013, 490, 238578, Deep Clade

    01/28/2013, 491, 191679, Refine 67 to 111 markers

    01/28/2013, 491, 259918, MT-DNA Plus

    01/31/2013, 494, 93184, Various SNPs

    02/06/2013, 495, 196407, Refine 12 to 37 markers

    02/06/2013, 495, 260617, Haplogroup Prediction

    02/06/2013, 495, 263111, MT-DNA

    02/15/2013, 496, 262731, Y-DNA 37

    02/20/2013, 497, 60411, Refine 67 to 111 markers

    02/20/2013, 497, 135549, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    02/27/2013, 498, 157462, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    02/27/2013, 498, 266076, Y-DNA 37

    02/27/2013, 498, 267120, Y-DNA 37

    03/06/2013, 499, 196882, Various SNPs

    03/06/2013, 499, 262731, Backbone

    03/06/2013, 499, 268404, Y-DNA 67

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.

     

    Deep Clade Test:  Once you know your Y chromosome male haplogroup, you may then focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through subclade testing, also known as Deep Clade testing.  FTDNA currently offers Deep Clade tests for Haplogroups E, G, H, I, J, N, O, and R.

     

    SNP Test:  You may also focus on your branch of the phylogenetic tree through testing for specific Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) which help determine your specific subclade.  The L257 SNP test is one example.

     

    Kittler Test:  This is an advanced test of one double marker called DYS385a/b.  By convention, the lowest value is always listed first and the highest value second.  This test will allow you to see the actual order of DYS385a/b.  For example, DYS385a/b is usually 14-11 in Haplogroup R1b and is usually 11-14 in Haplogroup R1a.

     

    DYF371X Test:  This is an advanced test that determines why certain individuals have a null value for DYS425, which is a fairly rare event.

     

    DYS464X Test:  This is an advanced test of DYS464, a fast-moving multi-copy DNA marker.  It could be called a “quazi-SNP” test and it has value for exploring both genealogy and anthropology.

     

    Factoids:  This is a lighthearted “cocktail party” test of predisposition to certain physical traits or conditions.  The list of factoids available to be tested include the following: alcohol flush reaction, avoidance of errors, back pain, bitter taste perception, caffeine metabolism, earwax type, freckling, longevity, male pattern baldness, muscle performance and nicotine dependence.

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Bid Farewell to NewFamilySearch and Welcome Family Tree


    The Mormon Church's NewFamilySearch (NFS) has been frustrating for people who do actual genealogical research and care about accuracy.  NFS allowed people with no particular skill to upload sketchy aggregated online family trees.  Family Search recently released a replacement for NFS called Family Tree.  Click here to read a blog written by Amy Tanner Thiriot that gives a step-by-step tutorial on how to correct the records contained in the Family Search database of the Mormon Church.

  • Indians migrated to Australia 4,000 years ago


    A new genetic study of more than 300 Aborigines indicates ancient Indians may have arrived on Australian shores about 4,000 years ago and mixed with Aborigines before Europeans colonised the continent.  This finding challenges the long-held assumption that humans arrived in Australia about 40,000 years ago from Africa and remained isolated from other populations until British settlers appeared in the late 18th century.  Click here to read more in the Telegraph.

  • DNA prediction of eye and hair color


    Scientists recently demonstrated they can use DNA results to predict eye and hair color in both contemporary and ancient skeletal remains.  Click here to read more in Investigative Genetics.

  • Transferring DNA Results from NG to FTDNA


    Genetic blogger Roberta Estes has written a blog about how to transfer your DNA results from National Geographic to Family Tree DNA.  Click here to read more in Roberta's blog.

  • Ancestry.com updates 1850 and 1940 censuses


    According to Dick Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter, Ancestry.com is performing maintenance on some of its existing databases in order to improve accuracy.  Click here to read more in Dick's newsletter.

  • Decoding Neanderthals


    Airing January 9, 2013, at 9 pm on PBS is a new program entitled "Decoding Neanderthals".  In this program, NOVA will explore the implications of the exciting new discovery that Neanderthals have left a small but consistent DNA signature in almost everyone outside of Africa today.  Click here to read more about this interesting new program or to watch it online.

  • DNA tests in progress at FTDNA


    Phillips Tests in Progress at FTDNA as of 01/07/2013:

     

    Due Date, Batch #, Kit #, Type of Test

     

    01/03/2013, 490, 238578, Deep Clade

    01/09/2013, 491, 134671, MT-HVR2 to Mega

    01/09/2013, 491, 191679, Refine 67 to 111 markers

    01/11/2013, 490, 259717, Haplogroup Prediction

    01/18/2013, 491, 259918, MT-DNA Plus

    01/23/2013, 493, 258322, Haplogroup Prediction

    01/31/2013, 494, 93184, L719, Z2245, Z2247

    02/06/2013, 495, 151181, Refine 37 to 67 markers

    02/06/2013, 495, 196407, Refine 12 to 37 markers

    02/06/2013, 495, 260617, Haplogroup Prediction

    02/06/2013, 495, 262604, Y-DNA 67

    02/06/2013, 495, 263111, MT-DNA

    02/15/2013, 496, 262731, Y-DNA 37

    02/20/2013, 497, 60411, Refine 67 to 111 markers

    02/20/2013, 497, 135549, Refine 37 to 67 markers

     

    EXPLANATION OF TESTS:

     

    Y-DNA Test:  This is a test of a man’s Y chromosome and it is a male specific test.  Women do not have a Y chromosome.  The Y chromosome is handed down from father to son over the generations, so results of this test are used to confirm or disprove a genealogical connection on the direct paternal line.  There are five different levels of yDNA tests offered by FTDNA:  12 markers, 24 markers, 37 markers, 67 markers and 111 markers.

     

    MT-DNA Test:  This is a test of mitochondrial DNA which is found in both men and women.  It traces the direct maternal line without influence from other lines.  Because mtDNA mutates very slowly, this test is more of an anthropological test than a genealogical test.  FTDNA offers the following mtDNA tests:  HVR1, HVR1 and 2, and Full Sequence (FGS) or Mega test.

     

    Super DNA Test:  This is a combination of a male specific-chromosome 67 marker test for the direct paternal line and the Full Mitochondrial Sequence (FMS) test for the direct maternal line.  Results identify the ethnic and geographic origin of the maternal and paternal lines of the individual being tested.

     

    Family Finder Test:  This is a test of autosomal DNA which is found in both men and women.  It is designed to trace most of your ancestral lines and it can identify relationships up to five generations back from you with confidence.

     

    Family Finder Conversion is the conversion of the original Family Finder test to a new platform called the Illumina Omni platform.  The new microarray chip tests about 710,000 unique autosomal DNA SNPs.  FTDNA is changing to the new platform because it offers better potential for future upgrade options.

     

    Backbone Test:  When you take any of the yDNA or mtDNA tests at FTDNA, your results include a free haplogroup determination.  Haplogroup is similar to nationality and reflects your very deep, ancient ancestry.  If your yDNA test is inconclusive, FTDNA will perform a free Backbone SNP test to determine your basic haplogroup designation.